Trials

  • February 05, 2024

    DOJ's Google Ad Tech Case Gets Sept. 9 Trial In Va.

    A Virginia federal judge teed Google up Monday for its next big antitrust battle and the first of three targeting its display advertising placement auction technology dominance, scheduling a Sept. 9 kickoff to the jury trial sought by the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • February 02, 2024

    Intel Presses Full Fed. Circ. For Total Relief From VLSI Verdict

    Intel urged the Federal Circuit on Friday to reconsider its holding that the company infringed a VLSI Technology computer chip patent, even as the court vacated a $1.5 billion infringement verdict tied to that patent.

  • February 02, 2024

    Ex-Trump Aide Peter Navarro Seeks To Stay Free Amid Appeal

    Former Trump White House adviser Peter Navarro argued Friday for remain out of custody pending appeal of his four-month sentence for refusing to comply with congressional subpoenas related to the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol, citing "close questions" about whether he should've been able to assert an executive privilege defense.

  • February 02, 2024

    Atty Says Feds Duped Grand Jury In $12M Somali Fraud Case

    Newly disclosed evidence of prosecutorial misconduct should end charges against a Maryland lawyer headed to trial in March over the alleged misappropriation of over $12 million in Somali state assets, his legal team told a federal judge Friday.

  • February 02, 2024

    Platinum Partners Co-Founder To Pay $2.4M In SEC Case

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced Friday that it had reached a more than $2.4 million settlement with a Platinum Partners co-founder to resolve claims that he both defrauded investment adviser clients of reinsurance and investment advisory business Beechwood and was a cause of fraud perpetrated on Platinum's clients.

  • February 02, 2024

    1st Circ. Fast-Tracks JetBlue And Spirit Merger Block Appeal

    JetBlue Airways and Spirit Airlines got their wish for a speedy appeal to a federal judge's decision blocking their plans for a $3.8 billion merger on Friday, with the First Circuit saying arguments would be heard in June.

  • February 02, 2024

    4th Circ. Vacates Va. Doctor's Conviction In Pill Mill Scheme

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday called for a new trial of a doctor who was sentenced to 40 years in prison over his opioid-prescription practices, finding that the jury was erroneously instructed during his trial.

  • February 02, 2024

    Birmingham, Ala., Hit with $4.5M Verdict Over Police Shooting

    An Alabama federal jury hit the city of Birmingham with a $4.5 million verdict over a fatal police shooting, finding that a city officer violated the constitutional rights of two people when he fired upon them while they were immobilized in a vehicle at the end of a car chase.

  • February 02, 2024

    Med Biller Who Posed As NBA Star, NFL Atty Gets 12 Years

    A Long Island medical biller was sentenced to 12 years in prison Friday after being convicted of bilking over $600 million from insurance companies through fraudulent billing submissions and impersonating NBA star Marcus Smart and the NFL's general counsel.

  • February 02, 2024

    Fla. Prosecutors' Improper Comments Sink Drug Conviction

    A Florida state appeals court threw out a man's drug convictions on Friday due to "inflammatory and abusive" statements prosecutors made about him to the jury, finding the comments were improper to the point that he should get a new trial even though his defense attorney didn't object to the state's comments at the time.

  • February 02, 2024

    Harvard Prof. Slams Study Showing IQ Gains From Fluoride

    A Harvard epidemiologist testifying Friday in a high-stakes bench trial over fluoridated water's risks criticized a study cited by the government that found fluoride exposure increases IQ by 24 points, saying the results "don't make sense," are "beyond the imagination" and must be based on erroneous data.

  • February 02, 2024

    BAT, Philip Morris Reach Patent Deal For Global Vape IP Fights

    British American Tobacco and Philip Morris International Inc. said Friday that the companies had come to a settlement resolving multiple heated tobacco and vape patent infringement suits.

  • February 02, 2024

    Ex-MoviePass Exec Embezzled For Coachella Party, Jury Says

    A California federal jury found a former executive at MoviePass Inc. guilty of embezzling $260,000 from the cinema subscription service's parent company to repay money the executive borrowed to host an event at the Coachella music festival in California, the U.S. Department of Justice said Friday.

  • February 02, 2024

    Conn. Agency Worker Deleted Bias Evidence, Jury Told

    Connecticut's environment and energy regulator told a federal jury Friday that a Black inspector who accused the agency of failing to remedy years of racial workplace hostility gave contradictory statements and deleted a photo that purported to document a noose tied near his desk.

  • February 02, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Won't Revive Lighting Graphics IP Suit Against Sony

    The Federal Circuit on Friday backed a Texas federal court's refusal to grant Infernal Technology LLC and Terminal Reality Inc. a new trial after a jury held that Sony didn't infringe their patents for lighting in computer graphics.

  • February 02, 2024

    Google Looks To Nix Epic's Play Store Win

    Google told a California federal court it should toss out a jury verdict in favor of Epic Games in its antitrust case over Android apps, saying the jury received improper instructions and also relied on a flawed view of the market that ignores competition from Apple.

  • February 02, 2024

    DC Judge Scraps Trump's March Trial Date

    A D.C. federal judge on Friday nixed Donald Trump's March 4 trial date in the criminal case accusing him of election interference as the D.C. Circuit continues to review whether the former president is immune from prosecution.

  • February 02, 2024

    Mass. Justices Affirm Time Limits In Trials, For Some Cases

    Massachusetts' highest court ruled Friday that trial judges may consider flexible time limits for the presentation of evidence and arguments, but only after what it characterized as an "informed analysis" of the specifics of the case, with input from the parties.

  • February 01, 2024

    Mo. Jury Awards $159M To Family Of Man Slain On Amtrak

    A Missouri federal jury on Wednesday issued a nearly $159 million verdict in favor of the family of a man killed on an Amtrak train passing through a Kansas City, Missouri, suburb, an award that includes $150 million in punitive damages against the railroad company.

  • February 01, 2024

    Voter Confidence In 2024 At Issue As Ga. Election Trial Wraps

    A monthlong trial over the integrity of Georgia's elections wrapped up Thursday in Atlanta with state officials arguing that switching from Dominion ballot-marking devices would fuel election deniers ahead of the 2024 presidential election, while voter plaintiffs said their trust is already broken by the state's use of the machines.

  • February 01, 2024

    Gilstrap Rules Netlist Trial Will Proceed Despite Axed Patents

    Micron cannot postpone Netlist's infringement suit against it from going to trial after Chief U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap adopted a magistrate judge's recommendation to deny Micron's motion to stay pending the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's review of two of the patents-in-suit following findings that others are invalid.

  • February 01, 2024

    Ex-Worldpay Exec Loses Bid To Revive Discrimination Suit

    An Ohio state appeals court refused to reverse a trial defeat for a fired Worldpay executive who alleged he endured retaliation for complaining about discrimination, among other things, rejecting his assertion that the company inappropriately wielded attorney-client privilege as both a "sword and a shield."

  • February 01, 2024

    Water Brand Had 'No One Qualified' To Make It, Jury Hears

    The Las Vegas jury weighing liver failure claims against "alkaline water" brand Real Water heard Thursday from a food safety expert about a 2018 health audit that she said found there was "no one qualified to make safe and clean water in this facility."

  • February 01, 2024

    Harvard Professor Testifies Fluoride Is 'Definitely' Neurotoxic

    A Harvard epidemiologist testified in a high-stakes bench trial over environmental groups' efforts to get the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to ban fluoride in 200 million Americans' drinking water that there is "definitely a causal relationship" between fluoride exposure and neurotoxicity, even at low exposure levels.

  • February 01, 2024

    DOJ Tells 1st Circ. Not To 'Rush' JetBlue, Spirit's Appeal

    The U.S. Department of Justice pushed back Wednesday on JetBlue and Spirit Airlines' bid for the expedited treatment of an appeal that seeks to preserve their $3.8 billion merger after it was blocked by a Massachusetts federal court, telling the First Circuit it has no obligation to meet the airlines' "self-imposed deadline."

Expert Analysis

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

    Author Photo

    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Tossed FIFA Bribery Convictions May Spur New DOJ Offense

    Author Photo

    After a New York federal court vacated the bribery convictions of two defendants in the U.S. Department of Justice’s sprawling FIFA probe, prosecutors may continue to pursue foreign commercial corruption through other means, albeit with some limitations, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

    Author Photo

    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Opinion

    Calif. Ruling Got It Wrong On Trial Courts' Gatekeeping Role

    Author Photo

    Ten years after the California Supreme Court reshaped trial judges’ role in admitting expert opinion testimony, a state appeals court's Bader v. Johnson & Johnson ruling appears to undermine this precedent and will likely create confusion about the scope of trial courts’ gatekeeping responsibility, say Robert Wright and Nicole Hood at Horvitz & Levy.

  • How Jan. 6 Riot Cases Could Affect White Collar Defendants

    Author Photo

    Though the prosecutions of individuals involved in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol deal with fact patterns markedly different from white collar offenses, the emerging case law on what it means to act “corruptly” will likely pose risks and opportunities for white collar defendants and their attorneys, says Ben Jernigan at Zuckerman Spaeder.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

    Author Photo

    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

    Author Photo

    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • Developers Are Testing Defenses In Generative AI Litigation

    Author Photo

    In the rapidly growing field of generative artificial intelligence law in the U.S., there are a few possible defenses that have already been effectively asserted by defendants in litigation, including lack of standing, reliance on the fair use doctrine, and the legality of so-called data scraping, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Corporate Compliance Lessons From FirstEnergy Scandal

    Author Photo

    Fallout from a massive bribery scheme involving Ohio electric utility FirstEnergy and state officeholders — including the recent sentencing of two defendants — has critical corporate governance takeaways for companies and individuals seeking to influence government policymaking, say attorneys at Wilson Sonsini.

  • Minn. Product Case Highlights Challenges Of Misuse Defense

    Author Photo

    The recent decision by a Minnesota federal court in McDougall v. CRC Industries illustrates that even where a product that is clearly being misused results in personal injuries, manufacturers cannot necessarily rely on the misuse defense to absolve them of liability exposure, says Timothy Freeman at Tanenbaum Keale.

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

    Author Photo

    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

  • A Higher Bar For Surviving Summary Judgment In SC Courts

    Author Photo

    The South Carolina Supreme Court's recent decision in Kitchen Planners v. Friedman, rejecting a lower court's usage of the mere scintilla standard for allowing cases to proceed, suggests that the mere existence of an alleged factual dispute between parties will no longer be sufficient to thwart a well-supported motion for summary judgment, says Denver Smith at Butler Snow.

  • 3rd Circ. Ruling Fine-Tunes The 'But It's Hemp' Defense

    Author Photo

    The Third Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Rivera decision, upholding the appellant’s conviction for marijuana possession, clarifies that defendants charged with trafficking marijuana have the burden of proving that the cannabis is actually federally legal hemp under the 2018 Farm Bill, say attorneys at McGlinchey Stafford.

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

    Author Photo

    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Trials archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!