Trials

  • February 06, 2024

    Ex-Contech Exec Asks 4th Circ. To Toss More Convictions

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the former Contech executive who was convicted of bid-rigging both agree that the Fourth Circuit should rethink the decision that wiped out that conviction, but for different reasons — one wants the conviction reinstated, while the other says the panel didn't go far enough.

  • February 06, 2024

    Water Brand Owes Over $129M For Liver Failures, Jury Finds

    A Las Vegas jury awarded more than $129 million Tuesday to five people who developed liver failure after drinking "alkalinized" Real Water, $100 million of it in punitive damages.

  • February 06, 2024

    Feds Fight Sen. Menendez's Bids To Nix Charges, Split Trials

    Federal prosecutors have asked a New York federal court to reject requests from U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez to dismiss his corruption case and to sever his trial from his wife's, arguing that the senator made "premature" factual arguments and incorrectly claimed immunity from prosecution as a senator.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ga. Justices To Review Gov't Listening To Atty-Client Calls

    The Georgia Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to hear the case of a man serving a 20-year prison sentence and seeking a new assault trial on the grounds that law enforcement officials improperly listened to three jailhouse calls between him and his lawyer.

  • February 06, 2024

    Water Co. Drivers Slam 'Out Of Touch' Bid To Ax OT Verdict

    A bottled water company's arguments that there was no evidence to support a jury's findings that it willfully violated federal overtime requirements are "out of touch" and completely rootless, a group of delivery workers told a Michigan federal judge, pushing back on the company's bid to undo their trial win.

  • February 06, 2024

    NY Judge Wants Info On Perjury Probe Of Trump Lieutenant

    A New York state judge weighing the evidence in Donald Trump's civil fraud trial demanded more information Tuesday about reports that a key trial witness, former Trump Organization Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg, is facing perjury charges for his testimony in the case.

  • February 06, 2024

    'Citizen Trump' Not Beyond Accountability, Says DC Circuit

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday affirmed that former President Donald Trump does not have immunity from prosecution for allegedly interfering in the 2020 presidential election. 

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Goldman Banker Settles SEC's Civil Insider Trading Suit

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has reached a settlement resolving its civil claims against a former Goldman Sachs banker convicted of insider trading, according to a motion for consent judgment filed in New York federal court Monday.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Trader Tells Jury $30M Losses Were Mistakes, Not Fraud

    An ex-trader charged with tanking his former employer by claiming inflated commissions and entering unauthorized trades that caused $30 million in losses testified Monday that he wasn't trying to defraud others but rather cover his hedges and correct significant mistakes he'd made while trading.

  • February 05, 2024

    Md. Jury Set To Decide If Ex-State's Atty Lied On Loan Apps

    The legal team representing former Baltimore state's attorney Marilyn Mosby said during closing arguments Monday that she mistakenly placed her trust in her then-husband to address tax debts the couple owed to the IRS, while federal prosecutors accused Mosby of shifting the blame for allegedly lying on mortgage loan applications.

  • February 05, 2024

    Water Brand's Recall Delay Merits Punitives, Jury Hears

    The Las Vegas "alkaline water" brand Real Water should pay punitive damages to five consumers whose livers failed, a jury heard in closing arguments Monday after being told the company waited months after a crescendo of complaints to issue a recall.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ga. Doctor's Roundup Fight Revived On Remand

    An Eleventh Circuit panel on Monday revived on remand from the full Eleventh Circuit a Georgia doctor's lawsuit alleging Monsanto failed to warn of Roundup's alleged cancer risks, clarifying that the doctor's state failure-to-warn claim is not expressly preempted by federal law and Monsanto hasn't shown implied preemption.

  • February 05, 2024

    Trump's Fans & Foes Warn Justices Against Narrow DQ Ruling

    As the U.S. Supreme Court ponders former President Donald Trump's potential disqualification from again being commander-in-chief, scholars and groups with wildly divergent views agree on this: If the justices take the easy route by deciding the case on narrow grounds, they'll put the nation and their own reputations on the road to ruin.

  • February 05, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Says Judge Was Wrong About Loofahs

    The Federal Circuit has vacated a lower court ruling that Infinity Headwear & Apparel LLC did not infringe a manufacturer's loofah patent, sending the case back for further proceedings.

  • February 05, 2024

    NY Judge Floats Nixing Some AG Claims From NRA Trial

    A New York state judge on Monday raised the prospect of dismissing claims from the trial of the National Rifle Association and key executives, after the New York attorney general's office rested its case in chief alleging widespread corruption at the nonprofit gun rights organization.

  • February 05, 2024

    Monsanto Pushes Back On Roundup Claims Before Del. Jury

    A lawyer for Monsanto Corp. told a Delaware jury on Monday that attorneys seeking regular and punitive damages based on alleged ties between Roundup exposure and a South Carolina man's fatal cancer want jurors to believe "everybody got it wrong" in finding the product safe.

  • February 05, 2024

    Lowe's Drops Appeal After $1.5M Faulty-Roof Settlement

    Lowe's Home Centers and a Philadelphia woman will drop their appeals after reaching a $1.5 million settlement over claims that the company improperly denied warranty repairs after an affiliated contractor allegedly botched a $9,500 roof installation, court records showed.

  • February 05, 2024

    AWOL Defendant Puts Ga. Pandemic Loan Fraud Trial On Hold

    A Georgia federal judge put on ice a trial that was planned to begin Monday after one of the three defendants accused of taking part in a multimillion-dollar pandemic loan fraud scheme failed to show up in court and now has federal marshals on his trail.

  • February 05, 2024

    1st. Circ. 'Concerned' With Crypto Founder's Trial Roadblocks

    A First Circuit judge suggested on Monday that a trial judge may have "short-circuited" a cryptocurrency founder's defense against fraud charges by blocking testimony from two government case agents and a U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission attorney.

  • February 05, 2024

    NCAA Athletes Seek Cert. In Payouts Case Sparked By Alston

    Current and former college athletes suing the NCAA over claims they were stiffed on payments authorized by the U.S. Supreme Court in its recent Alston decision moved on Friday to certify a class numbering tens of thousands of student-athletes, saying this is a "prototypical case for class certification."

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Ky. Prosecutor Convicted Of Trading Legal Favors For Sex

    A federal jury found a former Kentucky state prosecutor guilty of assisting a criminal defendant in exchange for sexual favors and explicit photos, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Saturday.

  • February 05, 2024

    Steptoe Adds IP Trial Partner From Orrick

    Steptoe LLP picked up an intellectual property litigation partner from Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP in its latest step to grow its new Houston-based practice, the firm said Monday.

  • February 05, 2024

    Teva Asks Fed. Circ. To Examine $177M Verdict Reversal

    Teva Pharmaceuticals has urged the Federal Circuit to reverse a Massachusetts federal judge's decision to toss out a $176.5 million migraine drug patent infringement verdict in its favor against Eli Lilly & Co., arguing that the judge's decision was based on "serious legal errors."

  • February 05, 2024

    Feds Want 20-Year Term For $30M Laundering Scheme Head

    A Georgia man convicted for his role in a $30 million money laundering scheme has urged a federal court to reject prosecutors' recommended 20-year prison sentence for his "horrendous criminal conduct" and for fleeing his trial.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Broker Loses 2nd Circ. Appeal In Sports Crypto Scam Case

    The Second Circuit on Monday affirmed a jury verdict convicting a former securities broker of stealing over $600,000 from investors who believed he was creating a sports-themed cryptocurrency.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Shows Need For Proffer Terms Negotiation

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Shah decision, holding that a defendant breached his proffer agreement, illustrates why defense attorneys should insist on negotiating the terms of such agreements with prosecutors to protect their clients at trial, say attorneys at Haynes Boone.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

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    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • 2nd Circ. OT Ruling Guides On Pay For Off-The-Clock Work

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    While the Second Circuit’s recent holding in Perry v. City of New York reiterated that the Fair Labor Standards Act obligates employers to pay overtime for off-the-clock work, it recognized circumstances, such as an employee’s failure to report, that allow an employer to disclaim the knowledge element that triggers this obligation, say Robert Whitman and Kyle Winnick at Seyfarth.

  • How Zero-Point Offender Change Should Work Retroactively

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    After the U.S. Sentencing Commission voted to make its new zero-point offender amendment retroactive, counsel should understand several key issues for further advocacy, including arguments for a time-served sentence, to prevent unwarranted sentencing disparities, say attorneys at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • How Zero-Point Offender Change Will Work Prospectively

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    The U.S. Sentencing Commission’s recent amendment, making defendants with zero criminal history points eligible for reduced sentences, is an important step toward decarceration, and counsel should understand how to effectively advocate for its application going forward, say attorneys at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

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    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • The Likable Witness: 6 Personality Archetypes To Cultivate

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    During pretrial witness preparation sessions, a few key methods can help identify the likable personality type a witness intuitively expresses, which can then be amplified at trial to create an emotional connection with jurors, says Gillian Drake at On Trial Associates.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • The Likable Witness: Key Traits And Psychological Concepts

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    Though witnesses must appear credible to juries, they should also be likable in order to make an emotional connection, and certain gestural, behavioral and psychological aspects of their testimony can be modified to improve their perceived likability, says Gillian Drake at On Trial Associates.

  • How Juror Questions Are Changing Civil Trials In Texas

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    Jurors in Texas are becoming increasingly involved during civil trials by submitting written questions for the judge or attorneys to ask witnesses — and given this new reality, attorneys must understand best practices for avoiding potential pitfalls at trial and beyond, say Daniella Main and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

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