Trials

  • February 05, 2024

    Steptoe Adds IP Trial Partner From Orrick

    Steptoe LLP picked up an intellectual property litigation partner from Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP in its latest step to grow its new Houston-based practice, the firm said Monday.

  • February 05, 2024

    Teva Asks Fed. Circ. To Examine $177M Verdict Reversal

    Teva Pharmaceuticals has urged the Federal Circuit to reverse a Massachusetts federal judge's decision to toss out a $176.5 million migraine drug patent infringement verdict in its favor against Eli Lilly & Co., arguing that the judge's decision was based on "serious legal errors."

  • February 05, 2024

    Feds Want 20-Year Term For $30M Laundering Scheme Head

    A Georgia man convicted for his role in a $30 million money laundering scheme has urged a federal court to reject prosecutors' recommended 20-year prison sentence for his "horrendous criminal conduct" and for fleeing his trial.

  • February 05, 2024

    Ex-Broker Loses 2nd Circ. Appeal In Sports Crypto Scam Case

    The Second Circuit on Monday affirmed a jury verdict convicting a former securities broker of stealing over $600,000 from investors who believed he was creating a sports-themed cryptocurrency.

  • February 05, 2024

    DOJ's Google Ad Tech Case Gets Sept. 9 Trial In Va.

    A Virginia federal judge teed Google up Monday for its next big antitrust battle and the first of three targeting its display advertising placement auction technology dominance, scheduling a Sept. 9 kickoff to the jury trial sought by the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • February 02, 2024

    Intel Presses Full Fed. Circ. For Total Relief From VLSI Verdict

    Intel urged the Federal Circuit on Friday to reconsider its holding that the company infringed a VLSI Technology computer chip patent, even as the court vacated a $1.5 billion infringement verdict tied to that patent.

  • February 02, 2024

    Ex-Trump Aide Peter Navarro Seeks To Stay Free Amid Appeal

    Former Trump White House adviser Peter Navarro argued Friday for remain out of custody pending appeal of his four-month sentence for refusing to comply with congressional subpoenas related to the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol, citing "close questions" about whether he should've been able to assert an executive privilege defense.

  • February 02, 2024

    Atty Says Feds Duped Grand Jury In $12M Somali Fraud Case

    Newly disclosed evidence of prosecutorial misconduct should end charges against a Maryland lawyer headed to trial in March over the alleged misappropriation of over $12 million in Somali state assets, his legal team told a federal judge Friday.

  • February 02, 2024

    Platinum Partners Co-Founder To Pay $2.4M In SEC Case

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced Friday that it had reached a more than $2.4 million settlement with a Platinum Partners co-founder to resolve claims that he both defrauded investment adviser clients of reinsurance and investment advisory business Beechwood and was a cause of fraud perpetrated on Platinum's clients.

  • February 02, 2024

    1st Circ. Fast-Tracks JetBlue And Spirit Merger Block Appeal

    JetBlue Airways and Spirit Airlines got their wish for a speedy appeal to a federal judge's decision blocking their plans for a $3.8 billion merger on Friday, with the First Circuit saying arguments would be heard in June.

  • February 02, 2024

    4th Circ. Vacates Va. Doctor's Conviction In Pill Mill Scheme

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday called for a new trial of a doctor who was sentenced to 40 years in prison over his opioid-prescription practices, finding that the jury was erroneously instructed during his trial.

  • February 02, 2024

    Birmingham, Ala., Hit with $4.5M Verdict Over Police Shooting

    An Alabama federal jury hit the city of Birmingham with a $4.5 million verdict over a fatal police shooting, finding that a city officer violated the constitutional rights of two people when he fired upon them while they were immobilized in a vehicle at the end of a car chase.

  • February 02, 2024

    Med Biller Who Posed As NBA Star, NFL Atty Gets 12 Years

    A Long Island medical biller was sentenced to 12 years in prison Friday after being convicted of bilking over $600 million from insurance companies through fraudulent billing submissions and impersonating NBA star Marcus Smart and the NFL's general counsel.

  • February 02, 2024

    Fla. Prosecutors' Improper Comments Sink Drug Conviction

    A Florida state appeals court threw out a man's drug convictions on Friday due to "inflammatory and abusive" statements prosecutors made about him to the jury, finding the comments were improper to the point that he should get a new trial even though his defense attorney didn't object to the state's comments at the time.

  • February 02, 2024

    Harvard Prof. Slams Study Showing IQ Gains From Fluoride

    A Harvard epidemiologist testifying Friday in a high-stakes bench trial over fluoridated water's risks criticized a study cited by the government that found fluoride exposure increases IQ by 24 points, saying the results "don't make sense," are "beyond the imagination" and must be based on erroneous data.

  • February 02, 2024

    BAT, Philip Morris Reach Patent Deal For Global Vape IP Fights

    British American Tobacco and Philip Morris International Inc. said Friday that the companies had come to a settlement resolving multiple heated tobacco and vape patent infringement suits.

  • February 02, 2024

    Ex-MoviePass Exec Embezzled For Coachella Party, Jury Says

    A California federal jury found a former executive at MoviePass Inc. guilty of embezzling $260,000 from the cinema subscription service's parent company to repay money the executive borrowed to host an event at the Coachella music festival in California, the U.S. Department of Justice said Friday.

  • February 02, 2024

    Conn. Agency Worker Deleted Bias Evidence, Jury Told

    Connecticut's environment and energy regulator told a federal jury Friday that a Black inspector who accused the agency of failing to remedy years of racial workplace hostility gave contradictory statements and deleted a photo that purported to document a noose tied near his desk.

  • February 02, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Won't Revive Lighting Graphics IP Suit Against Sony

    The Federal Circuit on Friday backed a Texas federal court's refusal to grant Infernal Technology LLC and Terminal Reality Inc. a new trial after a jury held that Sony didn't infringe their patents for lighting in computer graphics.

  • February 02, 2024

    Google Looks To Nix Epic's Play Store Win

    Google told a California federal court it should toss out a jury verdict in favor of Epic Games in its antitrust case over Android apps, saying the jury received improper instructions and also relied on a flawed view of the market that ignores competition from Apple.

  • February 02, 2024

    DC Judge Scraps Trump's March Trial Date

    A D.C. federal judge on Friday nixed Donald Trump's March 4 trial date in the criminal case accusing him of election interference as the D.C. Circuit continues to review whether the former president is immune from prosecution.

  • February 02, 2024

    Mass. Justices Affirm Time Limits In Trials, For Some Cases

    Massachusetts' highest court ruled Friday that trial judges may consider flexible time limits for the presentation of evidence and arguments, but only after what it characterized as an "informed analysis" of the specifics of the case, with input from the parties.

  • February 01, 2024

    Mo. Jury Awards $159M To Family Of Man Slain On Amtrak

    A Missouri federal jury on Wednesday issued a nearly $159 million verdict in favor of the family of a man killed on an Amtrak train passing through a Kansas City, Missouri, suburb, an award that includes $150 million in punitive damages against the railroad company.

  • February 01, 2024

    Voter Confidence In 2024 At Issue As Ga. Election Trial Wraps

    A monthlong trial over the integrity of Georgia's elections wrapped up Thursday in Atlanta with state officials arguing that switching from Dominion ballot-marking devices would fuel election deniers ahead of the 2024 presidential election, while voter plaintiffs said their trust is already broken by the state's use of the machines.

  • February 01, 2024

    Gilstrap Rules Netlist Trial Will Proceed Despite Axed Patents

    Micron cannot postpone Netlist's infringement suit against it from going to trial after Chief U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap adopted a magistrate judge's recommendation to deny Micron's motion to stay pending the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's review of two of the patents-in-suit following findings that others are invalid.

Expert Analysis

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 1st Tax Easement Convictions Will Likely Embolden DOJ, IRS

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    After recent convictions in the first criminal tax fraud trial over allegedly abusive syndicated conservation easements, the IRS and U.S. Department of Justice will likely pursue other promoters for similar alleged conspiracies — though one acquittal may help attorneys better evaluate their clients' exposure, say Bill Curtis and Lauren DeSantis-Then at Polsinelli.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Reconstruction-Era Laws Show Jan. 6 Cases Are Not Political

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    The renewed use of Reconstruction-era laws in indictments stemming from the Jan. 6 insurrection demonstrates that these statutes serve as a bulwark against erosion of the federal system, and provides a counterpoint to the public accusations that certain prosecutions are politically motivated, say Solomon Shinerock and Annika Conrad at Lewis Baach.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • A Closer Look At Evolving Early Release Programs

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    As the implementation of the First Step Act continues to progress and the U.S. Sentencing Commission amends its guidelines, white collar defense attorneys should understand the many mechanisms that can help reduce a client’s prison sentence early on in any case, say attorneys at Abell Eskew.

  • Teach Your Witness About 'Good' And 'Bad' Testimony Words

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    To ensure honest and accurate testimony in trials and depositions, attorneys must take care to educate their witnesses about the problematic words opposing counsel may use, such as “always” and “must,” and the effective words they can use in response, like “potentially” and “depends,” say Steve Wood and Bill Kanasky at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Unearthing The Lesser-Known 'Buried Facts' Doctrine

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    A New York federal judge’s recent suggestion that the “buried facts” doctrine may be applicable in the fraud trial of FTX cofounder Sam Bankman-Fried should serve as a reminder to attorneys in all kinds of cases involving corporate disclosures that this lesser-known rule could torpedo their defense, say Corban Rhodes and Li Yu at DiCello Levitt.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Shows Need For Proffer Terms Negotiation

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Shah decision, holding that a defendant breached his proffer agreement, illustrates why defense attorneys should insist on negotiating the terms of such agreements with prosecutors to protect their clients at trial, say attorneys at Haynes Boone.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

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