Trials

  • February 08, 2024

    Monsanto Fights $2.25B Verdict After Philly Roundup Trial

    Monsanto is fighting a Philadelphia jury's explosive $2.25 billion rebuke of its Roundup weedkiller in a cancer lawsuit, claiming that the judge overseeing the case made a strong string of unfair rulings such as allowing "inflammatory" testimony and "abusive" cross-examination.

  • February 08, 2024

    Live Nation Worker Can Fight $5.5M Disputed Atty Fee

    A New York appeals court on Thursday sustained a breach of contract counterclaim in a suit over $5.5 million in attorney fees against Morelli Law Firm PLLC stemming from a Live Nation event worker's historic $20 million personal injury award.

  • February 08, 2024

    Seattle Hospital Owes $215K In Mold Suit, Jury Finds

    A Seattle jury awarded $215,000 Thursday to three families whose children were prescribed antifungal treatment after being potentially exposed to toxic mold at Seattle Children's Hospital, concluding a bellwether damages trial and rejecting plaintiffs' request for far more. 

  • February 08, 2024

    Alex Jones Atty Calls Infowars 'Nonsense' In $1.4B Appeal

    Arguing in front of the shooting victims' families and squarely calling his client's broadcasts "nonsense," a lawyer for Alex Jones told the Connecticut Appellate Court on Thursday that $1.44 billion was too high a price for the Infowars website host's claims that the Sandy Hook school massacre was a "hoax."

  • February 08, 2024

    NY Judge Scolds Trump Attys For Response To Perjury Query

    The New York state judge overseeing Donald Trump's civil fraud trial on Thursday chastised defense attorneys for their "misleading" response to his demands for information about reports of possible perjury by defendant and key trial witness Allen Weisselberg.

  • February 08, 2024

    High Court Sides With Whistleblower Against UBS

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday found that whistleblowers don't need to show retaliatory intent on the part of their employers in order to be protected under federal law, in a unanimous ruling in favor of a former UBS employee and whistleblower who fought to restore a $900,000 jury verdict he secured in 2017.

  • February 07, 2024

    Spouses Ran PPP Fraud In Secret, Ga. Defendants Tell Jury

    A Georgia man and woman standing trial for charges that they helped orchestrate a scheme to illegally obtain $11 million in Paycheck Protection Program loans were unwittingly implicated in the fraud by their respective spouses, the defendants' lawyers told a federal jury Wednesday.

  • February 07, 2024

    Fluoride Judge To Attys: 'I Don't Need Perry Mason Moments'

    A California federal judge presiding over a bench trial over fluoridated water's risks agreed to give the parties more time to present their cases Wednesday, but told counsel they haven't been "particularly efficient," and that "I don't need the Perry Mason moments — I just need to get to the issues."

  • February 07, 2024

    Trump Trial Judge Gets Little Info On Exec's Alleged Perjury

    An attorney for Donald Trump and his companies' former chief financial officer Allen Weisselberg told the New York state judge presiding over their civil fraud trial Wednesday that she could not respond to "unsubstantiated" reports that the ex-CFO was in plea negotiations for allegedly lying on the stand, citing her ethical obligations.

  • February 07, 2024

    NRA Upped Compliance After AG Probe, Auditor Tells NY Jury

    An outside auditor for the National Rifle Association told jurors Wednesday in the New York fraud case against the gun rights group and its executives that the NRA is "very transparent" and has taken steps to address compliance deficiencies since the state's investigation began.

  • February 07, 2024

    Pfizer, Moderna Spar Over Trial Date In COVID Vaccine IP Case

    Moderna and Pfizer are battling over setting a trial date in a dispute in Massachusetts federal court over COVID-19 vaccine patent infringement claims, with Pfizer looking to schedule a trial after summary judgment motions are decided, while Moderna is arguing a firm trial date is needed now and should be set for this fall.

  • February 07, 2024

    Ill. Atty's Conviction Over Embezzlement Scheme Sticks

    A former attorney who cried "wolf" over the government preventing him from adequately preparing for trial cannot unwind his conviction for misappropriating a now-shuttered bank's embezzled funds and lying about his assets, an Illinois federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • February 07, 2024

    Ill. Jury Convicts Trader Of $30M Bond Fraud

    An Illinois federal jury on Wednesday convicted a former bond trader of tanking his Atlanta-based former employer by claiming inflated commissions on his trades and entering false and unauthorized trades that caused $30 million in losses.

  • February 07, 2024

    Mass. Atty Gets 2 Years For 'Corruptly' Pushing Pot Bribe Plot

    A former Massachusetts attorney "violated his oath corruptly" by bribing a police chief with payments to his brother to win a local marijuana license for a client, a federal judge said Wednesday as he handed down a two-year prison term.

  • February 07, 2024

    Camp Lejeune Plaintiffs Can't Get Jury Trial In Water Suit

    A group of North Carolina federal judges overseeing the Camp Lejeune contaminated-water litigation have struck the plaintiffs' bid for a jury trial, finding the Camp Lejeune Justice Act does not clearly and affirmatively grant a right to a jury trial in an action against the government.

  • February 07, 2024

    Trainer Who Doped Horses Avoids Prison In Cooperation Deal

    A New York trainer who admitted drugging horses so that the outcomes of their races could be fixed avoided prison Wednesday after a Manhattan federal judge credited his extensive cooperation with prosecutors to include testifying at two trials.

  • February 07, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Trial Date Scrapped After Judge Shuffle

    Alec Baldwin's trial date in August has been nixed following a judge reassignment in the case against the actor, who is accused of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the on-set shooting death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins during the filming of "Rust" in New Mexico.

  • February 06, 2024

    Feds Say Mukasey Repping SBF, Mashinsky Possible Conflict

    Prosecutors alerted a New York federal judge Tuesday about a possible conflict stemming from Sam Bankman-Fried's recent hiring of Marc Mukasey, who also represents Celsius founder Alex Mashinsky in his criminal proceedings, noting Celsius lent money to Alameda Research, which repaid some of the loans using FTX's customer funds.

  • February 06, 2024

    Seattle Hospital Must Pay Up For 'Huge' Negligence, Jury Told

    Counsel for three families whose children had to undergo anti-fungal treatment after a Seattle hospital exposed them to mold urged a Washington state jury Tuesday to aim high on their damages award during closing arguments in a bellwether trial, citing lasting consequences that merit more than "a couple hundred thousand dollars."

  • February 06, 2024

    1st Circ. Appears Unlikely To Deflate Balloon Fraud Verdict

    A defunct Massachusetts air balloon company on Tuesday struggled to persuade the First Circuit to throw out a fraud verdict by arguing that the jury had "rubber-stamped" a judge's damages estimate.

  • February 06, 2024

    Feds' Fraud Case Based On Faulty Assumptions, Jury Hears

    A former bond trader argued Tuesday that an Illinois federal jury should clear him of accusations that he claimed inflated commissions and tanked his former employer with $30 million in losses because trial evidence proved prosecutors "jumped to conclusions" about his trades.

  • February 06, 2024

    Siemens' $13.2M Verdict Upheld In Coal Equipment Dispute

    A Florida federal judge has upheld a $13.2 million award in favor of Siemens Energy Inc. after the Eleventh Circuit revived a dispute over coal gasification equipment, saying the company wasn't being unfair in its agreement with a Canadian oilfield services business.

  • February 06, 2024

    AI Image Co. Hit With $14.1M Verdict Over Lowball Buyout

    A California federal jury returned a $14.1 million verdict Monday in favor of investors alleging AI-imaging software company ArcSoft and its billionaire CEO duped them into selling their shares for less than they were worth by hiding information about the business's success, its move to China and its eventual IPO.

  • February 06, 2024

    Ex-Pemex Exec Tells Jury Of Vitol Bribes For $200M Gas Deal

    A former executive of a unit of Mexico's state-owned oil and gas company on Tuesday told a Brooklyn federal jury of how he and a colleague agreed to accept hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes from Vitol Group, in exchange for confidential information to help the Geneva-based energy-trading giant win a $200 million gas contract.

  • February 06, 2024

    Pacira Touts Stability Upgrade In Pain Drug Patent Trial

    A novel manufacturing process that extends the shelf life of the pain reliever Exparel should extend the exclusivity period of the product's patent, Pacira BioSciences Inc. has told a New Jersey judge tasked with weighing infringement claims against generic-drug maker eVenus.

Expert Analysis

  • Lessons From This Year's Landmark Green Energy IP Clash

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    In this year's Siemens v. General Electric wind turbine patent dispute, a Massachusetts federal court offers a cautionary tale against willful infringement, and highlights the balance between innovation, law and ethics, as legal battles like this become more frequent in the renewable energy sector, say John Powell and Andrew Siuta at Sunstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Tips For Defeating Claims Of Willful FLSA Violations

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    As employers increasingly encounter wage and hour complaints under the Fair Labor Standards Act, more companies could face enhanced penalties for violations deemed willful, but defense counsel can use several discovery and trial strategies to instead demonstrate the employer’s commitment to compliance, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Trump NY Fraud Trial Shows Civil, Criminal Case Differences

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    Former President Donald Trump’s civil fraud trial currently unfolding in New York provides a reminder that civil bench trials can be just as damaging, if not more so, than criminal prosecutions, due to several key elements of civil litigation procedure, says retired attorney David Moskowitz.

  • How New Expert Rules Are Already Changing Court Decisions

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    Though not formally effective until last week, some courts have been relying for several years on amended federal rules clarifying judges’ gatekeeping role, so counsel should be prepared to justify their expert witnesses’ methodologies and expect additional motion practice on expert testimony admissibility, say Colleen Kenney and Daniel Kelly at Sidley.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • How Color Psychology Can Help Tell Your Trial Narrative

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    Research shows that color is a powerful sensory input that affects memory and perception, so attorneys should understand how, when and why to use certain shades in trial graphics to enhance their narrative and draw jurors’ focus, says Adam Bloomberg at IMS Consulting.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Asserting 'Presence-Of-Counsel' Defense In Securities Trials

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    As illustrated by the fraud trial of FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried, defense attorneys in securities trials might consider arguing that counsel had some involvement in the conduct at issue — if the more formal advice-of-counsel defense is unavailable and circumstances allow for a privilege waiver, say Joseph Dever and Matthew Elkin at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Why Criminal No-Poach Cases Can Be Deceptively Complex

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    Mark Rosman at Wilson Sonsini discusses the reasons many criminal no-poach cases that appear simple are actually more complicated than they seem, following several jury trial acquittals and two dismissed cases.

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