Daily Litigation

  • 'This Isn't A Game': Pro Se Ex-Law Student Schooled At Trial

    A California federal judge overseeing a disability discrimination trial brought by a former student at John F. Kennedy College of Law scolded the pro se litigant Monday after he protested not being able to cross-examine witnesses in writing, saying court rules had to be followed and "this isn't a game."

  • Live Nation Can't Cancel Suit Over Eras Tour Sales Meltdown

    A California federal judge refused Friday to end a proposed securities class action alleging Live Nation made misleading statements about its operations when news of alleged anticompetitive practices with Ticketmaster caused stock prices to drop, finding the suit describes "a materially different state of affairs" than what Live Nation claimed.

  • AmEx Fights To Arbitrate Merchant's Girardi-Linked Suit

    An attorney for American Express Co. urged a California federal judge on Monday to reconsider his tentative ruling declining to force a costume merchant to arbitrate malicious prosecution claims over charges disputed by Erika Girardi, saying the agreement in question applies to the merchant and not just his company.

  • Sales Reps Score $1.6M In Fees After Beating RICO Case

    A federal judge in Los Angeles has ordered a biotech startup to pay more than $1.6 million in legal fees to two former employees, after the company failed to convince a jury that the pair broke racketeering laws when they worked for a rival that stole proprietary information when setting up shop.

  • Fed. Circ. Affirms Freshub Didn't Lie To Revive Patent App

    The Federal Circuit on Monday upheld a Texas federal court's ruling that Amazon's Alexa voice assistant didn't infringe voice-processing system patents owned by Freshub and that Freshub didn't use nefarious means to obtain those patents.

  • Boston Sued For Records Of White Supremacist Protest

    The city of Boston and two law enforcement agencies are flouting the state's public records laws to avoid scrutiny over what one expert called an "intelligence failure of significant proportions" during a march by an avowed white supremacist group in 2022, a lawsuit filed Monday by the National Lawyers Guild alleges.

  • Proud Boys' Attys Can't Escape IP Suit In DC

    A D.C. federal judge has denied a bid to throw out a copyright suit from a group of criminal defense attorneys who represented members of the Proud Boys involved in the insurrection of Jan. 6, 2021.

  • Chancery Approves Snap Inc. Deal, Trims Fee Award By $2M

    An agreement between Snapchat parent Snap Inc. and a class of shareholders to settle litigation that accused the social media platform of giving its founders too much voting power won Delaware Chancery Court approval Monday, but shareholder attorneys got just $4.5 million of the $6.6 million in fees that they sought.

  • $9.7M Financial Network Telemarketing Deal Gets Final OK

    A California federal judge granted final approval Friday to a $9.75 million class action settlement against a debt consolidation company and its subsidiaries for telemarketing calls that plaintiffs say violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

  • NC Legal Advice Law Fight Targets Wrong Party, AG Says

    A North Carolina nonprofit challenging a state law banning anyone but a fully licensed attorney from offering legal advice has sued the wrong party, the state attorney general's office said Monday in seeking to have the case tossed.

  • Chancery Says 'Game Over' On Fee Windfalls For Easy Cases

    A Delaware vice chancellor has publicly slammed stockholder attorneys who sought an $850,000 fee for "minuscule" hours spent on a corporate benefit case after a recent string of suits filed to police stockholder rights to separate class votes on company transactions.

  • Kirkland Nabs $14.6M Payout For Cyxtera's Ch. 11

    A New Jersey bankruptcy judge on Monday approved $43.8 million in final fee and expense applications for professionals involved in Cyxtera Technologies Inc.'s Chapter 11 case, with almost half the money going to an investment banking firm and roughly $15 million to Kirkland & Ellis LLP.

  • Randall J. Baron and David A. Knotts

    Inside Robbins Geller's $192.5M Deal In Novel Walgreens Suit

    Following the collapse of a proposed merger between pharmacy giants Rite Aid and Walgreens, plaintiffs firm Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP pursued a novel class action on behalf of Rite Aid inventors against Walgreens, eventually securing a landmark $192.5 million settlement after eight years of litigation that the attorneys involved say was the result of their creative approach and success on key discovery battles.

  • Miffed NC Biz Court Mulls Sanctions After Missed Deadlines

    A North Carolina Business Court judge on Monday chided counsel on both sides of an employment dispute for missing important deadlines on the eve of a jury trial, causing him to postpone the trial indefinitely and contemplate dismissing the case entirely.

  • Sports & Betting Group Of The Year: Winston & Strawn

    Winston & Strawn LLP's sports law practice notched several high-profile wins in 2023, including helping certify a class of 184,000 college athletes who are seeking an injunction against the NCAA over their name, image and likeness rights — one of many cases earning the firm a spot as one of Law360's Sports Law Practice Groups of the Year.

  • Ex-Atty's Retaliation Suit Must Go, NJ Atty Ethics Office Says

    The New Jersey Office of Attorney Ethics reiterated to a federal court Monday that a retaliation suit from a disbarred attorney lacks the detail needed to go to discovery and ignores the fact that some of the defendants are immune to being sued individually.

  • Layn R. Phillips.png

    Meet The Ex-Judge Mediating J&J's Talc Concealment Suit

    The former federal judge who will oversee negotiations in an investor class action against Johnson & Johnson in New Jersey over its cancer-linked talcum powder is a highly experienced and outstanding mediator to whom both plaintiffs and defendants turn in high-profile and complicated cases, attorneys say.

  • Conn. Client Pans Firm's Late Reveal Of Prior Email Mess

    An optometrist who claims a fraudster infiltrated her lawyer's email system and tricked her into wiring $90,586 to an incorrect account has challenged the firm's "very late post-trial disclosure" of five pages of emails about an alleged earlier incident, saying the messages are relevant to her own case.

  • Cole Scott Fights DQ Bid In Fla. Over Atty's Prior Work

    Cole Scott & Kissane PA has told a Florida federal court that the firm should not be disqualified from defending a car wreck lawsuit because a partner's representation of the plaintiff in a prior personal injury lawsuit involved a completely unrelated vehicle accident.

  • Burford, Sysco Object To Nixed Swap In Price-Fixing Suits

    Restaurant food distributor Sysco and a Burford Capital affiliate both objected to a federal magistrate judge's decision not to allow the affiliate to replace Sysco in sprawling price-fixing lawsuits against pork and beef producers, asserting that the denial contravenes civil procedure rules and public policy.

  • Marshall & Melhorn Seeks Pause To Settle Data Breach Row

    Ohio firm Marshall & Melhorn LLC and a proposed class of over 27,000 of its clients affected by a 2021 ransomware attack urged an Ohio federal judge on Friday to institute a pause in the suit so they can reach a settlement with an outside mediator.

  • julie-capell.jpg

    Davis Wright's New LA Leader On Mentorship, Firm Culture

    Julie Capell, Davis Wright Tremaine LLP's partner-in-charge of the firm's Los Angeles area offices, says she is finally living out a dream she's had for nearly two decades: being the leader of a law firm office.

  • Product Liability Group Of The Year: Covington

    Covington & Burling LLP's product liability group helped McKesson Corp. notch a trial win in the nationwide opioid litigation and secured a dismissal of claims against Hain Celestial Group Inc. over allegations that their baby food contained dangerous amounts of heavy metals, earning the group a spot as one of Law360's Product Liability Groups of the Year.

  • Securities Group Of The Year: Bernstein Litowitz

    Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann LLP recently secured $1 billion for Wells Fargo investors who claimed losses over the bank's risk management practices and reached a $145 million settlement on behalf of investors in Allianz's Structured Alpha Funds, earning the firm a place among Law360's Securities Practice Groups of the Year.

  • Voters Fight DeSantis' Bid To End Prosecutor Suspension Suit

    Two voters are urging a Florida federal judge not to throw out their suit challenging Gov. Ron DeSantis' suspension of elected prosecutor Monique Worrell, saying the case brings "plausible claims" of "egregious and norm-breaking constitutional violations" by the governor.

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Expert Analysis

  • What Web3 Means For Lawyers' Ethical Duties Author Photo

    As law firms embrace Web3 technologies by accepting cryptocurrency as payment for legal fees, investing in metaverse departments and more, lawyers should remember their ethical duties to warn clients of the benefits and risks of technology in a murky regulatory environment, says Heidi Frostestad Kuehl at Northern Illinois University College of Law.

  • NY's Cybersecurity CLE Rule Is A Sign Of Changing Times Author Photo

    New York's recently announced requirement that lawyers complete cybersecurity training as part of their continuing legal education is a reminder that securing client information is more complicated in an increasingly digital world, and that expectations around attorneys' technology competence are changing, says Jason Schwent at Clark Hill.

  • Opinion

    Law Firms Stressing Work-Life Balance Are Missing The Mark Author Photo

    Law firms struggling to attract and retain lawyers are institutionalizing work-life balance through hybrid work models, but such balance is elusive in a client services and tech-dependent world, underscoring the need for firms to instead aim for attorney empowerment and true balance within — not outside — the workplace, says Joe Pack at Pack Law.

  • A Law Student's Guide To Thriving As A Summer Associate Author Photo

    Summer associates are expected to establish a favorable reputation and develop genuine relationships in a few short weeks, but several time management, attitude and communication principles can help them make the most of their time and secure an offer for a full-time position, says Joseph Marciano, who was a 2022 summer associate at Reed Smith.

  • Burnout Prevention Requires Effort From Attys And Firms Author Photo

    To avoid physical and emotional exhaustion, attorneys must respect their own and their colleagues' personal and professional boundaries, but law firms must also play a role in discouraging burnout culture — especially if they are struggling with attorney retention, say attorneys at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • How I Owned My Power As An Asian American Woman In Law Author Photo

    Gibson Dunn's Debra Yang shares the bumps in her journey to becoming the first female Asian American U.S. attorney, a state judge and a senior partner in BigLaw, and how other women can face their self-doubts and blaze their own trails to success amid systemic obstacles.

  • Successful In-House Alt Legal Services Start With 4 Questions Author Photo

    Law firms that are considering creating an in-house alternative legal service provider should focus not on recapturing revenue otherwise lost to outside vendors, but instead consider how a captive ALSP will better fulfill the needs of their clients and partners, say Beatrice Seravello and Brad Blickstein at Baretz & Brunelle.

  • 3 Reasons To Embrace Jargon In Legal Marketing Content Author Photo

    Ignore what you've been told about jargon — adding insider industry terms to your firm's marketing and business development content can persuade potential clients that you have the specialized knowledge they can trust, says Wayne Pollock at Law Firm Editorial Service.

  • Future Lawyers Expect DEI Commitments Beyond Recruiting Author Photo

    To attract future lawyers from diverse backgrounds, firms must think beyond recruiting efforts, because law students are looking for diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives that invest in employee professional development and engage with students year-round, says Lauren Jackson at Howard University School of Law.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Law Students Build Real-World Skills? Author Photo

    Allison Coffin at Akin Gump discusses how summer associates going back to school can continue to develop real-world lawyering skills by leveraging the numerous law school resources that support professional development both inside and outside the classroom.

  • How Firm Leaders Can Build And Sustain Culture Author Photo

    In uncertain and challenging times, law firm leaders can build and sustain culture by focusing attention on mission, values and leadership development, and applying a growth mindset across their firms, says Scott Westfahl at Harvard Law.

  • The Case That Showed Me The Value Of E-Discovery Plans Author Photo

    Robert Keeling at Sidley reflects on leading discovery in the litigation that followed the historic $85 billion AT&T-Time Warner merger and how the case highlighted the importance of having a strategic e-discovery plan in place.

  • What Litigators Can Expect From The Metaverse Author Photo

    As virtual reality continues to develop, litigators should consider how it will affect various aspects of law practice — from marketing and training to the courtroom itself — as well as the potential need for legal reforms to ensure metaverse-generated data is preserved and available for discovery, says Ron Carey at Esquire Deposition Solutions.

  • Opinion

    CLE Accreditation Should Be Tied To Learning Outcomes Author Photo

    Given the substantial time and money lawyers put toward mandatory continuing legal education, CLE regulators and providers should be held to accreditation standards that assess learning outcomes, similar to those imposed on law schools and continuing medical education providers, says Rima Sirota at Georgetown Law.

  • Persuading The Court With Visual Aids In Written Argument Author Photo

    Robert Dubose at Alexander Dubose describes several categories of visuals attorneys can use to make written arguments easier to understand or more persuasive, and provides tips for lawyers unused to working with anything but text.

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