Daily Litigation

  • Ill. Justices Weigh Whether Rule Violation Merits Fee Award

    The Illinois Supreme Court has questioned whether two law firms should be allowed to preserve their $1.7 million fee award for their work on a family dispute that settled after they were fired, as the justices asked whether fees are appropriate if the firms never disclosed how they would split the money.

  • Kwok Trustee's RICO Suit Paused Pending NY Criminal Trial

    A Connecticut bankruptcy judge Friday paused two adversary actions in the Chapter 11 bankruptcy of Ho Wan Kwok until the exiled Chinese businessman's criminal trial for fraud and racketeering, slated to start in May, wraps up.

  • Former Hiller Atty Fights To Keep Entire Wage Suit Standing

    A former cannabis attorney at boutique firm Hiller PC told a New York state judge on Friday that her wage suit should stay in place in its entirety, saying that her contract existence doesn't prevent unjust enrichment claims.

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    San Fran Law School Center Leader To Start New Clinic

    This summer, the longtime leader of the influential Center for WorkLife Law at the University of California College of the Law, San Francisco will step aside to focus on a new organization she is spinning off from WorkLife Law.

  • SEC Sanctions NY Atty For 'Improper Professional Conduct'

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has barred a New York-based attorney from practicing before the agency, saying she engaged in "improper professional conduct" by failing to comply with a requirement that she not do further work for a two-year period for a company she had represented in proceedings.

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    How Attys Won Settlement Over Florida's 'Don't Say Gay' Law

    Kaplan Hecker & Fink LLP and its co-counsel at the National Center for Lesbian Rights zeroed in on the broad and nondescriptive nature of Florida's "Don't Say Gay" law in a roughly two-year legal battle against state officials over the controversial statute and recently won what they hailed as a historic settlement.

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    Women Attys Navigate Shifting Expectations Over Makeup

    Some women attorneys say makeup helps them feel more polished and confident at work, but they acknowledge that the desire to express themselves this way is often dictated by the legal industry's idea of what's appropriate, forcing them to navigate ever-shifting expectations in a field once shaped by men.

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    The Supreme Court's Week: By The Numbers

    The U.S. Supreme Court issued two rulings and heard arguments in six cases this week, with arguments about the ability of the federal government to work with social media companies to combat misinformation garnering a lot of attention. Here, Law360 Pulse takes a data-driven dive into the week that was at the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • Pa. Panel Says Tort Statute Can't Kill Contract Claims

    A Pennsylvania appellate panel has revived a breach of contract suit brought by a pro se litigant against his former counsel for failing to provide adequate legal services, finding the trial court was wrong to reclassify the contract complaint as a tort claim for legal malpractice and then toss it on statutory grounds.

  • Ill. Judges End Diversity Rules That Drew Conservative Ire

    The Seventh Circuit's chief judge has resolved judicial misconduct complaints targeting allegedly discriminatory standing orders by some Illinois federal judges encouraging younger, female and minority attorneys to handle oral arguments, after two of the judges rescinded their policies in response to the complaints.

  • Lewis Brisbois Accused Of Filing 'Sham' Suits To Avert Fault

    A group of 185 Chinese investors have accused Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP attorneys of filing numerous lawsuits — and collecting $3.8 million in legal fees — to cover for failing to read "draconian" contract terms that led the investors to lose their $92.5 million stake in a $2.5 billion Los Angeles mixed-use development.

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    Milbank Pro Bono Counsel On Leading By Example

    Milbank LLP attorneys logged more than 54,000 hours of pro bono work across the firm's 12 offices worldwide in 2023, with 96% of its lawyers in the U.S. volunteering their time. According to Anthony Perez Cassino, the firm's pro bono counsel, it's a commitment to public service work that starts at the top.

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    Judges And Law Scholars Divided Over AI Standing Orders

    Several federal judges have issued standing orders blocking or putting guidelines on the use of artificial intelligence over accuracy issues with the technology, but a few legal scholars have raised concerns that the orders might discourage attorneys and self-represented litigants from using AI.

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    Wood Smith Expands In Fla. With 2 New Shops, 19 Hires

    Wood Smith Henning & Berman LLP announced the opening of two offices in the Sunshine State alongside a slate of new hires, including Chad Dunigan, an experienced construction-focused litigator who will helm the new locations in Orlando and Jacksonville, who is joining with 17 colleagues from Koeller Nebeker Carlson Haluck LLP.

  • Cuomo Sister May Sit For Retaliation Claim Depo, Judge Says

    A Manhattan federal judge provisionally held Friday that Madeline Cuomo, the sister of former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, should sit for a deposition to address claims that she facilitated an effort to retaliate against a woman who has accused the former governor of harassment.

  • Albright Denies Salesforce Bid For Patent Sanctions

    Salesforce.com Inc. waited too long to pursue sanctions against a prolific patent litigator who already voluntarily dismissed claims brought in a federal suit in Texas, U.S. District Judge Alan D. Albright has ruled, agreeing with a magistrate judge's report and recommendation to toss the sanctions bid.

  • Voir Dire: Law360 Pulse's Weekly Quiz

    The legal industry began spring with a busy week of BigLaw moves as firms expanded practices and shifted headcounts. Test your legal news savvy here with Law360 Pulse’s weekly quiz.

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    In 107K Pro Bono Hours: Hogan Lovells Tackles Racial Justice

    Hogan Lovells pledged to dedicate 65,000 pro bono hours to advancing racial justice in June 2020, and, according to a report out this week, the firm's personnel have exceeded that goal by dedicating approximately 107,000 hours through 2023 to causes across the globe aimed at advancing racial justice.

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    Fox Rothschild Hires Lewis Brisbois Insurance Vet In Seattle

    Fox Rothschild LLP has hired an insurance litigator in Seattle who focuses her practice on a range of commercial and liability disputes and joins the firm after working for a decade at Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP, the firm has announced.

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    Polsinelli Adds In-House Biotech IP Atty In Boston

    An experienced in-house biotechnology attorney has joined Polsinelli PC's intellectual property department as counsel in Boston.

  • Burford, Sysco Get OK To Swap Bid In Price-Fixing Cases

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday agreed to allow an affiliate of legal investment firm Burford Capital to substitute for food giant Sysco in price-fixing litigation against broiler chicken producers, a ruling that comes a month after a Minnesota federal judge refused to allow the same Burford unit to substitute for Sysco in similar pork and beef price-fixing litigation.

  • 'Access Hollywood' Tape Key To Trump Verdict, 2nd Circ. Told

    Writer E. Jean Carroll urged the Second Circuit on Wednesday not to undo a $5 million verdict finding that Donald Trump sexually abused and defamed her, saying the jury rightly viewed the former president's infamous "Access Hollywood" tape because it revealed "his modus operandi."

  • 8th Circ. Backs Attys' Win In COVID Hotel Eviction Challenge

    Two government attorneys did not violate the U.S. Constitution when they gave the green light to a Minnesota police department to forcibly remove a resident from a Super 8 motel in June 2020 amid a COVID-19 era eviction ban, the Eighth Circuit ruled in a precedential opinion Thursday, citing a "dearth of precedent."

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    Ex-Moses & Singer Partner Says New-Mom Bias Is Rampant

    A former partner at New York litigation firm Moses & Singer LLP said she witnessed women at the firm go from being considered "superstars" to "mommy brained" after returning from maternity leave, according to a declaration attached to an amended pregnancy discrimination complaint in federal court.

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    Unabomber Prosecutor To Probe FTX's Sullivan & Cromwell Ties

    The Delaware bankruptcy court overseeing the Chapter 11 case of FTX Trading Ltd. has approved the appointment of a former federal prosecutor, whose experience includes work on the Unabomber case, to delve into accusations Sullivan & Cromwell is conflicted as debtor's counsel.

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