Ohio

  • January 31, 2024

    The Rail Industry And The East Palestine Wreck: 1 Year Later

    A year after a Norfolk Southern train carrying toxic chemicals derailed on the border of Ohio and Pennsylvania, sprawling consolidated litigation and proposed regulations carry the promise of preventing a recurrence even though federal accident investigators have not yet issued a final determination on what caused the disaster.

  • January 31, 2024

    6th Circ. Mulls How To Filter Ageist Insults From Other Barbs

    The Sixth Circuit seemed hesitant Wednesday to reopen a suit from a General Motors engineer who said he was harassed and transferred to a job with fewer overtime opportunities illegally because he's over 50, with panel judges grappling with how to separate explicit age-based insults from other offensive conduct.

  • January 31, 2024

    Power Cos. Tell 3rd Circ. FERC Was Locked Into Auction Rules

    Electricity providers told a Third Circuit panel in oral argument Wednesday that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission improperly changed its rules on the fly in 2023 in order to tweak the results of a PJM Interconnection electricity capacity auction, arguing that once the auction procedures were set, the agency should have been bound to stick with them.

  • January 30, 2024

    Ohio Operator Settles Choice Hotels' TM Suit For $400K

    A former Comfort Inn location operator has agreed to pay lodging franchisor Choice Hotels $400,000 to settle claims in Ohio federal court that the operator continued to use the Choice Hotel's marks and signage after their franchise agreement was scrapped.

  • January 30, 2024

    Lordstown Wants More Time To File Ch. 11 Plan

    Electric truckmaker Lordstown has asked a Delaware bankruptcy judge to give the Ohio company additional time to submit a Chapter 11 plan before anyone else is allowed to do so in its case, saying negotiations have been productive and that the extra time will allow the parties to resolve disputes over the plan.

  • January 30, 2024

    Real Estate Rumors: Eldawy, Wake Stone, Ohio Police & Fire

    Developer Mohamed Eldawy is said to be seeking city approval for a $250 million mixed-use project in Galveston, Texas, Wake Stone Property is reportedly investing $48 million toward expanding an industrial park in North Carolina, and the Ohio Police & Fire Pension Fund could be investing up to $275 million in real estate this year.

  • January 30, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs Antero's Win In Oil Royalties Breach Suit

    The Sixth Circuit affirmed on Tuesday a lower court's dismissal of a lessor's contract breach suit accusing Antero Resources of underpaying royalties under an oil-and-gas lease, finding the lessor failed to follow the lease's 90-day presuit notice requirement and "made no attempt to provide any prelawsuit notice at all."

  • January 30, 2024

    Hyundai, Kia Can Ask 9th Circ. To Vet Cities' Car-Theft Claims

    A California federal judge said Hyundai and Kia can ask the Ninth Circuit to consider whether cities in New York, Ohio and Wisconsin can sue the automakers over a nationwide wave of car thefts following a viral TikTok trend that popularized tips for breaking into their vehicles.

  • January 30, 2024

    1 Year Later: How 2 States Reckoned With A Train Derailment

    In the nearly one year since a Norfolk Southern Railway Co. cargo train derailed and released toxic chemicals in East Palestine, Ohio, right on the border of western Pennsylvania, both states have launched environmental monitoring programs and secured funding or financial commitments from the company.

  • January 29, 2024

    Mich. Residents Urge 6th Circ. To Preserve Lead Water Claims

    Residents of Benton Harbor, Michigan, urged the Sixth Circuit to reject city officials' request for qualified immunity in a class action alleging they misled the public about the safety of the city's drinking water.

  • January 29, 2024

    The Top Attys In Clinton's Impeachment Trial, 25 Years Later

    One of them just went to federal prison, and another famously beat a federal indictment. One has been seeking the White House, and another has been steering a BigLaw powerhouse. Each was among the two dozen attorneys who litigated President Bill Clinton's historic impeachment trial 25 years ago this month — and then saw their lives go in dramatically different directions.

  • January 29, 2024

    Google Tells Ohio Court That Search Isn't A 'Common Carrier'

    Google urged an Ohio state court to reject a bid by enforcers to have its search engine declared a common carrier, saying the move would be a vast expansion of the law and violate the company's First Amendment rights by dictating what it shows in search results.

  • January 29, 2024

    Judge Won't Pause Ohio Trafficking Case For Centralization

    An Ohio federal judge denied a woman's bid to pause her sex trafficking lawsuit while she awaits a decision to have her case centralized with other trafficking cases because it would delay efficient resolution.

  • January 29, 2024

    Ohio Clerk Must Face News Service's 1st Amendment Suit

    An Ohio federal judge has denied a county court clerk's bid to escape a legal news service's suit claiming that he's blocking access to newly filed complaints, ruling that the sovereign immunity typically reserved for public officials doesn't foreclose constitutional claims.

  • January 26, 2024

    Nelson Mullins' Rates Spark Coverage Spat Over Builder's Suit

    An insurance policy battle between an exterior building product manufacturer and its insurer over who should pay for a law firm's services in a separate lawsuit spilled into Ohio federal court this week after the insurer removed the company's case from state court to the federal arena.

  • January 26, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs Rehire Of Union Guard Fired For Sleeping

    A security company must reinstate a guard who was accused of sleeping on the job and subsequently terminated, the Sixth Circuit ruled on Friday, finding an arbitrator relied on the parties' collective bargaining agreement when issuing the award that said the worker wasn't let go for just cause.

  • January 26, 2024

    Off The Bench: McMahon Sued, 'Rock' Victory, USC Feels Heat

    In this week's Off The Bench, WWE founder Vince McMahon has been sued for sexual abuse and trafficking, "The Rock" reclaimed his name, and USC defended its claim that college athletes aren't employees. If you were on the sidelines over the past week, Law360 is here to clue you in on the biggest sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • January 26, 2024

    What Gender-Affirming Care Cases Mean For Benefits Attys

    Ongoing legal battles over restrictions on youth access to gender-affirming medical care may spur employers to upgrade their benefits to help health plan participants travel out of state to seek treatment and open up a new area of liability for plan administrators. Here's a look at three things benefits attorneys should know about legal fights over limitations on gender identity-related care.

  • January 25, 2024

    4 Tattoo Copyright Claims Against NBA Video Game Tossed

    An Ohio federal judge ruled that some tattoos must be excluded from a copyright infringement lawsuit against the makers of the video game series NBA 2K because the man who inked the tattoos on three basketball stars had not properly registered the images when he filed his complaint.

  • January 25, 2024

    Philly Children's Hospital Avoids Baby Brain Injury Suit

    A $7 million medical malpractice settlement for claims that an Ohio doctor's operation injured an unborn child precluded a separate lawsuit claiming that Children's Hospital of Philadelphia caused the same injuries by not treating the same issue, a Pennsylvania appellate court ruled Thursday.

  • January 25, 2024

    Notice Delay In Chubb's $3.3M Recoupment Bid Bugs 6th Circ.

    A Sixth Circuit panel peppered a Chubb unit with questions Thursday about why the carrier should be able to recoup $3.3 million from two other insurers for its defense of windshield repair company Safelite against a competitor's suit, despite a four-year delay in notice.

  • January 25, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Reverse 'Willy-Nilly' For Investment Firm

    A Sixth Circuit panel told investment firm Stout Risius Ross Inc. it wouldn't reverse a Michigan federal court's decision "willy-nilly" at oral arguments Thursday, when the firm sought to prevent partial reimbursement for underlying stock valuation litigation while its insurer continued to fight for total payback.

  • January 25, 2024

    Advisory Firm Asks 6th Circ. To Ax Insurer's Win In SEC Case

    An investment advisory firm argued Thursday that a Tennessee federal court erred in deciding that its insurance policy excluded coverage for an underlying suit from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, telling a Sixth Circuit panel that the exclusion rendered the policy illusory.

  • January 24, 2024

    Bid To Swap Chevron For An Old Standby Raises Doubts

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court debated whether a World War II-era doctrine encouraging courts to strongly consider agency statutory interpretations could replace the court's controversial so-called Chevron doctrine that requires judges to defer to those interpretations if a statute is ambiguous.

  • January 24, 2024

    Ohio Justices Revive Disposal Co.'s Gov't Taking Claims

    The Ohio Supreme Court on Wednesday revived a drilling waste disposal company's bid to secure compensation for a government-ordered shutdown following an earthquake, saying the court of appeals failed to weigh whether the shutdown order amounted to a "taking" of property.

Expert Analysis

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

    Author Photo

    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

    Author Photo

    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

    Author Photo

    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

    Author Photo

    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

    Author Photo

    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

    Author Photo

    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

    Author Photo

    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

    Author Photo

    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Class Action Defense: Don't Give Up On Bristol-Myers Squibb

    Author Photo

    Federal appellate court decisions in the six years since the U.S. Supreme Court decided Bristol-Myers Squibb show that it's anyone's ballgame in class action jurisdictional arguments, so defendants are encouraged to consider carefully whether, where and when arguing lack of specific personal jurisdiction may be advantageous, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

    Author Photo

    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

    Author Photo

    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

    Author Photo

    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Expands The Horizons Of Debt Discharge

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit Bankruptcy Appellate Panel’s recent ruling in RS Air v. NetJets demonstrates that creditors should not be quick to conclude that their recoveries are limited if a debtor commences bankruptcy and receives a discharge, and should instead consider other potential paths for recovery, like alter ego claims, say Dania Slim and Claire Wu at Pillsbury.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

    Author Photo

    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Ohio archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!