Business of Law

  • April 16, 2024

    Winston & Strawn Settles Brief-Plagiarizing Allegations

    A Tuesday filing indicated that Winston & Strawn LLP has managed to settle copyright infringement allegations coming from a boutique intellectual property firm that went to a federal court in Manhattan to accuse the BigLaw firm of copying a motion-to-dismiss filing "nearly verbatim."

  • April 16, 2024

    Jackson, Barrett Seek Enron Law Compromise In Jan. 6 Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court grappled Tuesday with whether an obstruction of Congress statute enacted in the wake of an accounting scandal can be read broadly enough to prosecute alleged U.S. Capitol rioters.

  • April 16, 2024

    Smartmatic Settles Election Defamation Suit Against OANN

    Electronic voting system company Smartmatic has settled its defamation suit in Washington, D.C., federal court alleging One America News Network peddled conspiracy theories claiming the firm rigged voting machines during the 2020 presidential election, the company said in a statement Tuesday.

  • April 16, 2024

    NJ Hospital GC Emails Doom $24M Verdict For Surgeons

    The New Jersey Supreme Court on Tuesday vacated a $24.3 million award to a group of neurosurgeons on their claim that a hospital didn't operate in good faith, finding the trial court's admission of emails from the hospital's general counsel and remarks made during closing arguments deprived the hospital of a fair trial.

  • April 16, 2024

    Feds Want To Boot Gibbons Atty From Menendez Bribery Case

    Prosecutors plan to call a Gibbons PC attorney as a witness during the bribery trial of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey and want him disqualified from representing another defendant in the case, they told a New York federal judge Tuesday.

  • April 16, 2024

    Seyfarth Lands 3 Morgan Lewis Employment Pros In Calif.

    A trio of labor and employment attorneys have moved from Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP to Seyfarth Shaw LLP in California, the firm said Tuesday.

  • April 16, 2024

    Young Conaway Unveils Salary Bump For Associates

    Delaware law firm Young Conaway Stargatt & Taylor LLP announced Tuesday that it had increased its starting salaries for associates to $210,000, effective immediately, citing a commitment to recruit and retain top talent.

  • April 16, 2024

    BigLaw Attys Among First 7 Jurors Picked In Trump's NY Trial

    Two BigLaw attorneys on Tuesday were among seven people sworn in as jurors in Donald Trump's Manhattan hush money trial, which could proceed to opening statements as soon as Monday.

  • April 16, 2024

    Focus On Prosecutor Will Set Ga. Trump Jury Questions Apart

    The jury questionnaire currently before hundreds of Manhattan residents in Donald Trump's first criminal trial will serve as a partial blueprint for his upcoming election interference case in Georgia, experts told Law360, with at least one significant difference: a sharp focus on the Fulton County case's high-profile, controversial prosecutor.

  • April 15, 2024

    Law Firm Shooting Victim Was 'In Constant Fear,' Family Says

    A woman who was killed in a shooting that also took the life of her husband, prominent Las Vegas personal injury lawyer Dennis Prince, "lived in constant fear for her safety" as she battled her ex-husband for custody of their two young children, her parents said Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Face Off Over Shadow Docket Procedures

    The U.S. Supreme Court's internal disagreements over how to manage its emergency docket were on full display Monday in its decision allowing Idaho to enforce a ban on gender-affirming care for minors — a case the court's liberals said wasn't worthy of their intervention, but its conservatives touted as a win in the fight against universal injunctions.

  • April 15, 2024

    Trump Tells Justices Impeachment Required For Prosecution

    Former President Donald Trump told the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday that the "inevitably and unavoidably" political nature of prosecuting a former president requires input from Congress, arguing the U.S. Constitution's framers carefully wrote the impeachment clause to act as an initial hurdle for criminal prosecutions.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Leave Lower Courts To Parse Corporate 'Half-Truths'

    A recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling that corporate silence isn't enough to form the basis of a securities fraud suit pointedly declined to wade into the question of what counts as a "half-truth," leaving it to lower courts to wrestle with which corporate statements are blurry enough to sustain a shareholder class action.

  • April 15, 2024

    Dueling Bills Highlight Partisan Divide Over 'Judge Shopping'

    Dueling proposals to limit so-called judge shopping were unveiled by Senate party leaders last week, sparking optimism that Congress will rein in plaintiffs' ability to bring cases before judges they think will be friendly to their views, while others raised questions about the proposals' feasibility.

  • April 15, 2024

    Baltimore Taps DiCello Levitt, Saltz Mongeluzzi For Key Bridge

    The city of Baltimore announced Monday it has hired DiCello Levitt and Saltz Mongeluzzi Bendesky PC as it plans legal action against those responsible for a container ship destroying the Francis Scott Key Bridge last month, the same day FBI agents boarded the ship as part of a criminal investigation.

  • April 15, 2024

    Harvard Says Antisemitism Case Not 'Legally Appropriate'

    Harvard University has said a lawsuit seeking to force it to submit to court-ordered monitoring and other conditions following allegations of antisemitism on campus "is neither an effective nor legally appropriate vehicle" to address the issue.

  • April 15, 2024

    Prosecutor Says Trump Can't Keep Punting Docs Deadlines

    The special counsel prosecuting former President Donald Trump over the alleged mishandling of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate has asked a Florida federal judge to deny Trump's request for another delay, arguing Trump should not be able to use a trial against him in New York to further delay the proceeding.

  • April 15, 2024

    Microsoft, Walmart CLOs Recognized For Integrity, Creativity

    The legal chiefs at Microsoft and Walmart are among about a dozen leading corporate lawyers who soon will be recognized at the Burton Awards as "Legends in Law" for their track records of addressing complex matters and creativity in solving challenges.

  • April 15, 2024

    Consumer Class Action Trio Joins Morgan Lewis From Crowell

    Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP said Monday that it has added three partners from Crowell & Moring LLP to its consumer class action and product liability practice.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justice Thomas Misses Monday's Supreme Court Arguments

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas was absent Monday for oral arguments examining disputes over whether accepting illegal gratuities without a quid pro quo is prohibited under a federal bribery statute and what test courts should apply when determining whether malicious prosecution claims can proceed. 

  • April 15, 2024

    Stressed About The Trump Trial? Imagine How The Attys Feel

    A trial-of-the-century moment like Donald Trump's New York criminal case heaps singular attention and pressure on the lawyers involved — and a commensurate need for smart stress relief tactics during months of prep, lawyers who have taken on landmark cases say.

  • April 15, 2024

    Trump Accused Of Witness Threats As Jury Selection Begins

    The Manhattan district attorney's office on Monday asked the judge overseeing Donald Trump's hush money trial to find Trump in contempt for flouting the court's gag order barring witness intimidation, on day one of jury selection in the first criminal trial of a former U.S. president.

  • April 12, 2024

    In Case You Missed It: Hottest Firms And Stories On Law360

    For those who missed out, here's a look back at the law firms, stories and expert analyses that generated the most buzz on Law360 last week.

  • April 12, 2024

    Trump Can't Derail Hush Money Trial Over Media Saturation

    A New York judge overseeing Donald Trump's hush money case on Friday rejected another of the former president's bids to derail trial next week, waving off his complaints that prejudicial media coverage has tainted the jury pool.

  • April 12, 2024

    'Much More Is Coming': Experts See Wave Of AI-Related Suits

    Legal experts speaking Friday at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law's symposium on artificial intelligence and evidence in civil litigation warned that broadening usage and increased regulation will lead to a wave of litigation over the technology, leaving courts to analyze the "black box" of corporate AI algorithms to determine liability.

Expert Analysis

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • Wachtell-X Ruling Highlights Trend On Arbitrability Question

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    A growing body of case law, including a California state court's recent decision in X Corp. v. Wachtell, holds that incorporation of specific arbitral body rules in an arbitration provision may in and of itself constitute clear and unmistakable evidence of delegation of arbitrability to an arbitrator, and thus such clauses should be drafted carefully, say attorneys at Norton Rose.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

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