International Trade

  • April 22, 2024

    DC Judge Backs Feds' Power To Sanction Ex-Afghan Officials

    A Washington, D.C., federal judge shaved down a lawsuit challenging U.S. financial and immigration sanctions against two former Afghan lawmakers, stressing that the executive branch has sweeping authority to issue sanctions on individuals it finds to be corrupt.

  • April 19, 2024

    Nestlé Strikes Deal Ending Gray-Market Drinks Trademark Row

    Nestlé USA Inc. and two food distributors have asked a Texas federal judge to permanently dismiss their trademark infringement fight accusing the distributors of illegally selling so-called gray-market versions of Nescafe Clasico and Abuelita products, saying parties recently reached a settlement agreement.

  • April 19, 2024

    Investor Suit Over Intel's Chip Production Won't Be Rebooted

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday upheld a federal district court's dismissal of a proposed class action against Intel that alleged the tech giant hid problems with the production of its highly anticipated new computer processors, ruling the suit fails to show the defendants knew the company would miss the projected product release date.

  • April 19, 2024

    Thai Co. Pays $20M For 'Egregious' Iran Sanctions Violations

    Thai-based SCG Plastics will pay $20 million to resolve claims it committed over 460 "egregious" violations of Iranian sanctions by causing U.S. banks to process $291 million in wire transfers in connection with the sales of high-density polyethylene resin made in Iran, as well as obscuring the resin's origin in shipping documents.

  • April 19, 2024

    Steelmaker Asks ITC To Halt EV Imports From Vietnamese Co.

    Luxembourg-based steel manufacturer ArcelorMittal is asking the U.S. International Trade Commission to bar electric vehicle imports from Vinfast, which claims to be the first Vietnamese business to ship electric cars worldwide, with ArcelorMittal saying the company is infringing its patented aluminum-steel coating.

  • April 19, 2024

    Fla. Can't Wage Real Estate War On Foreigners, 11th Circ. Told

    A group of Chinese citizens and a brokerage firm urged the Eleventh Circuit on Friday to block Florida from enforcing a law prohibiting certain foreign nationals from owning land while they challenge the statute's constitutionality, saying it's discriminatory and preempted by federal authority.

  • April 19, 2024

    Commerce Again Ordered To Back Chinese Flooring Duty Data

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Friday ordered the U.S. Department of Commerce to again justify using Brazilian data when calculating duties for Chinese wood flooring, saying Commerce failed to back its decision with evidence for a second time.

  • April 19, 2024

    China Seeks To Boost Hong Kong's Status As Market Hub

    China's securities regulators unveiled several measures on Friday designed to boost Hong Kong's stature as an international hub and ultimately benefit both jurisdictions amid lean times for capital raising, according to statements from securities officials.

  • April 19, 2024

    Gibbons Atty Won't Testify In Menendez Bribery Trial

    A Gibbons PC lawyer who is counsel for one of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez's co-defendants in his federal bribery trial set to start next month will not be called to the witness stand after defense lawyers and prosecutors agreed Friday to a stipulation about the facts that would have been part of his testimony.

  • April 18, 2024

    Lack Of Process Delays CFIUS Enforcement, Watchdog Says

    The interagency committee tasked with ensuring that foreign investments do not jeopardize national security lacks a formal process for launching enforcement actions against companies that run afoul of their commitments, according to a watchdog report made public Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    Lebanese Bank To Face Victims' Hezbollah Terrorism Suit

    New York's highest court ruled Thursday that an entity that acquires another entity's liabilities and assets inherits its status for purposes of personal jurisdiction even if there is no merger, greenlighting litigation targeting a Lebanese bank over its predecessor's alleged assistance to Hezbollah.

  • April 18, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Maintains Newman Can't Invalidate Disability Law

    Suspended U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman has still not proven that the Judicial Conduct and Disability Act has no constitutional uses and should therefore be invalidated, the Federal Circuit's judicial council told a D.C. federal judge Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    Cybersecurity Startup Loses 2 Patents At PTAB

    A small cybersecurity startup litigating in Virginia federal court against larger tech companies has failed to persuade the Patent Trial and Appeal Board not to invalidate the entirety of two patents covering ways of combating "evolving" online threats, among other things.

  • April 18, 2024

    Commerce Chided For Not Explaining Itself In Catfish Cases

    The U.S. Court of International Trade has kicked the final decision in a 2019 review of catfish duties back to the U.S. Department of Commerce, saying the agency flubbed basic administrative law by failing to "show its work" amid crisscrossing claims.

  • April 18, 2024

    Sugar Co. Urges 11th Circ. To Revive Helms-Burton Suit

    North American Sugar Industries Inc. asked the Eleventh Circuit Thursday to revive its suit accusing several companies that shipped wind turbines to Cuba of violating the Helms-Burton Act, saying the trial court erred in tossing its claims for lack of jurisdiction.

  • April 18, 2024

    Trade Court Says Gov't Must Redo Mexican Tomato Probe

    The U.S. Court of International Trade ordered the U.S. Department of Commerce to redo a decades-old investigation into Mexican tomatoes, saying officials couldn't update the probe with new information when they were called to resume the long-delayed review.

  • April 18, 2024

    Atty Wants Law Firm Subpoenaed In $12M Somali Fraud Case

    A Maryland attorney accused of misappropriating more than $12 million in Somali state assets has asked a federal judge to subpoena his former firm, Shulman Rogers Gandal Pordy & Ecker PA, to produce his employment records.

  • April 17, 2024

    Menendez Trial Date In Limbo Over Pact On Atty's Testimony

    A co-defendant's reticence has stalled an agreement on the scope of a Gibbons PC attorney's testimony in the bribery case of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez and two New Jersey businessmen, leaving the much-litigated trial date of May 6 in limbo.

  • April 17, 2024

    Senate Scorn Suggests Election Strife For Biden On Trade

    Two White House announcements on Wednesday aimed at girding the U.S. industrial sector against Chinese competition did little to quell senators' frustrations over President Joe Biden's resolve to tackle unfair trade practices, adding pressure to Biden's reelection bid.

  • April 17, 2024

    Biden Says Tariffs On Chinese Steel Should Be Tripled

    President Joe Biden promised Wednesday to seek significantly steeper tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminum imports should the U.S. Trade Representative confirm that China is engaging in unfair trade practices that erode competition.

  • April 17, 2024

    EV Tax Credit Restrictions, Trade Bills Advance In House

    The House Ways and Means Committee advanced several trade bills Wednesday that would impose more restrictions for new electric vehicles to qualify for a federal tax credit, assert congressional authority in agreements with foreign governments, and renew the country's largest and oldest trade preferences program.

  • April 17, 2024

    Biden Admin Probes Chinese Shipbuilders For Unfair Trade

    The Biden administration launched an investigation Wednesday into whether China used unfair practices to gain a competitive edge in the global shipping and maritime services sector, setting the stage for potential new tariffs against Beijing.

  • April 17, 2024

    Jury Says Caterpillar's Interference Cost Equipment Co. $100M

    A jury in Delaware has rejected antitrust claims against Caterpillar but found that the equipment maker caused a defunct importer $100 million in damages by interfering with its contract to sell equipment through an online sales platform.

  • April 17, 2024

    Bankman-Fried Appeal May Cite Unusual Preview Testimony

    Sam Bankman-Fried's appeal of his conviction and 25-year prison sentence may cite a "rather unprecedented" trial procedure in which the FTX founder gave provisional testimony before officially taking the witness stand last year, one of his attorneys said Wednesday.

  • April 17, 2024

    Judge Delays Trial Over $20M Allegedly Hidden From IRS

    A Florida federal judge agreed Wednesday to delay the trial of a Brazilian-American businessman accused of hiding $20 million from the Internal Revenue Service by using Swiss bank accounts, but told the defendant the new deadlines are firm.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Seafarer Detention Under Ship Pollution Law Must Have Limits

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    The U.S. Coast Guard should reinstate limits on the number of days that foreign crew members may be forced to remain in the country while the U.S. Department of Justice investigates alleged violations of shipping pollution laws, in order to balance legitimate enforcement interests and seafarer welfare, say attorneys at Blank Rome.

  • Assigning Liability In Key Bridge Collapse May Be Challenging

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    In the wake of a cargo ship's collision with Baltimore's Key Bridge last month, claimants may focus on the vessel's owners and the agencies responsible for the design and maintenance of the bridge — but allocating legal liability to either private or governmental entities may be difficult under applicable state and federal laws, says Clay Robbins at Wisner Baum.

  • Data Protection Steps To Consider After Biden Privacy Order

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    A recent White House executive order casts a spotlight on the criticality of securing sensitive content communications, presenting challenges and necessitating a recalibration of practices, especially for lawyers, says Camilo Artiga-Purcell at Kiteworks.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • New Proposal Signals Sharper Enforcement Focus At CFIUS

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    Last week's proposed rule aimed at broadening the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States' enforcement authority over foreign investments and increasing penalties for violations signals that CFIUS intends to continue expanding its aggressive monitoring of national security issues, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Traversing The Web Of Nonjudicial Grievance Mechanisms

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    Attorneys at Covington provide an overview of how companies can best align their environmental and human rights compliance with "hard-law" requirements like the EU's recently approved Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive while also navigating the complex global network of existing nonjudicial grievance mechanisms.

  • Analyzing New EU Measure To Prevent Reexports To Russia

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    Niels Ersbøll, Alexander Italianer and Laura Beuls at Arnold & Porter offer a comprehensive overview of the European Union's new rule requiring export agreements to contain a clause prohibiting the reexport of goods to Russia, and discuss what companies should do to ensure compliance.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • When Trade Secret Protection And Nat'l Security Converge

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    The Trump administration's anti-espionage program focused on China is over, but federal enforcement efforts to protect trade secrets and U.S. national security continue, and companies doing business in high-risk jurisdictions need to maintain their compliance programs to avoid the risk of being caught in the crosshairs of an investigation, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Cos. Should Prepare For Foreign Data Transfer Regulations

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    A new regulatory regime designed to protect U.S. sensitive data from countries of concern may complicate an already intricate geopolitical landscape and affect even companies beyond the data industry, but with careful preparation, such companies can endeavor to minimize the effect on their business operations and ensure compliance, say David Plotinsky and Jiazhen Guo at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • How Export Controls Are Evolving To Address Tech Security

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    Recently proposed export control regulations from the U.S. Department of Commerce are an opportunity for stakeholders to help pioneer compliance for the increasing reliance on the use of outsourced technology service providers, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

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