Employment

  • February 21, 2024

    Salesman Accused Of AI Misuse Must Hand Over Co. Docs

    A Connecticut salesman who allegedly used the artificial intelligence application Otter to record company calls must return any of his former employer's internal documents that are still in his possession and swear that he no longer has any of the material at issue in a trade secrets lawsuit, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 21, 2024

    Drexel U Dodges Expanded 'Intentional Interference' Claims

    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania ruled Wednesday that at-will employees can sue for intentional interference with their employment relationships under state law, but said a former Drexel University accountant who had brought the case before them fell short of showing her supervisor was acting as a third party under the new tort.

  • February 21, 2024

    'Loser Pays' Arbitration Pact Spurs Age Bias Case's Revival

    An Ohio state appeals court revived a fired orthodontist's age bias suit claiming she was sacked after complaining that a younger colleague harassed her, ruling that a trial court was too quick to kick the case to arbitration in light of the contract's potentially problematic "loser pays" clause.

  • February 21, 2024

    MLB Wants Out Of Ex-Scouts' Colorado Age Bias

    Major League Baseball took another swing at dismissing a proposed age discrimination class action filed by several former scouts Tuesday, stressing that the vast majority of the suit has no place in Colorado federal court.

  • February 21, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Revive Ex-NC Assistant AG's Bias Suit

    The Fourth Circuit on Wednesday refused to revive a former assistant attorney general's gender and disability bias suit against the North Carolina Department of Justice, finding her medical conditions weren't extreme enough to warrant pausing the deadline to refile her complaint.

  • February 21, 2024

    Tully Rinckey's Employment Terms Violated Rules, Panel Says

    The founders of Tully Rinckey PLLC should be suspended for 90 days for placing improper employment restrictions on people who worked in the firm's Washington, D.C., office, an attorney ethics committee has recommended.

  • February 21, 2024

    Judge Floats Sanctions For Union's 'Bad Faith' Recusal Bid

    A Michigan federal judge won't recuse himself from a defamation case involving two unions after a claim was raised that he expressed bias against the East Coast, instead asking the defendants why sanctions shouldn't be imposed for "bad faith" litigating.

  • February 21, 2024

    Cochran Firm Rachets Up Fee Fight With Ex-Associate

    The Cochran Firm California is escalating its ongoing dispute over attorney fees with a former associate, alleging in a new lawsuit that the now-departed lawyer lied to a managing partner about her relationship with a client with a lucrative claim.

  • February 21, 2024

    Law Firms Rip Cuomo Subpoenas As 'Abusive' And 'Wasteful'

    Law firms Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP and Vladeck Raskin & Clark PC said in a letter Tuesday filed in federal court that former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's subpoena regarding their sex harassment investigation "is plainly improper and is another in a string of abusive and wasteful tactics."

  • February 21, 2024

    Ex-Law Prof Wants High Court To Hear Gender Bias Suit

    A white female former law professor urged the U.S. Supreme Court to hear her suit against Texas Southern University, saying the Fifth Circuit held her to too high of a standard to show she was subjected to so much bullying that she was forced to quit.

  • February 21, 2024

    Lewis Brisbois Adds 2 Professional Liability Pros In Portland

    Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP has hired two employment and professional liability attorneys previously with Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP as partners in its Portland, Oregon, office, the firm has announced.

  • February 21, 2024

    Wells Fargo Settles With Alleged Trade Secrets Poacher

    A Georgia federal court on Tuesday ended a recently settled lawsuit from Wells Fargo Bank against a former employee who was accused of stealing a trove of records from the bank on the eve of his departure for a competing payment processing company.

  • February 21, 2024

    Bradley Arant Adds Ex-Baker Botts Labor, Employment Leader

    Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP is deepening its bench in the Lone Star State with the addition of its latest partner in Dallas, the former chair of Baker Botts' labor and employment practice.

  • February 20, 2024

    Liberal Justices Hint Chevron Deference Hanging By A Thread

    In the U.S. Supreme Court's latest battle royal over administrative powers, left-leaning justices at oral arguments Tuesday openly suggested that the landmark legal doctrine underpinning modern rulemaking might soon shrivel up, clearing the way for industry-led challenges to regulations on the books for decades.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ill. Public Defender Sues Over Display Of Israeli Army Photo

    An Illinois public defender filed a First Amendment lawsuit against her county employer after she was reprimanded for a photograph of her holding a gun in front of an Israeli flag that she displayed in an office area in response to the Oct. 7 Hamas terrorist attack in Israel.

  • February 20, 2024

    Wells Fargo Says SEC Has Closed Hiring Practices Probe

    Wells Fargo said Tuesday that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has closed an investigation into the bank's hiring practices, following allegations that some bank managers conducted sham interviews to meet a diversity quota, while Barclays PLC has said it no longer faces an investigation into its anti-money laundering compliance.

  • February 20, 2024

    Bank's Ex-Employees Must Face Trade Secrets Suit

    A Texas federal judge refused on Tuesday to toss the bulk of trade secret claims against a group of former employees of a company that eventually became Centennial Bank, but he did agree to trim some claims.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-OCC Fintech Chief Won Over Top Brass Despite Red Flags

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency's onetime fintech chief who seemingly fabricated his professional background appears to have sailed through the hiring process at the agency, according to internal OCC communications obtained by Law360.

  • February 20, 2024

    Amentum Can Claim Some COVID Leave Costs From Air Force

    The Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals has ruled that Amentum Services can partially claim increased costs under an Air Force contract based on California's COVID-19 sick leave laws but that sovereign immunity bars claims based on a military quarantine requirement.

  • February 20, 2024

    Kirkland Can't Get 'Invasive' Atty Info From 2 BigLaw Firms

    A California federal magistrate judge barred Kirkland & Ellis LLP from subpoenaing confidential personnel information from a former intellectual property associate's prior employers, Paul Hastings LLP and Fish & Richardson PC, in its defense against her discrimination suit, ruling that Kirkland's subpoena requests are "invasive," irrelevant and "amazingly broad."

  • February 20, 2024

    Insurer Must Pay Defense Costs In Newspaper Shooting Row

    An insurer owed coverage to the parent companies of a Maryland newspaper for the legal fees resulting from two underlying lawsuits brought by the victims and their families after a 2018 mass shooting, an Illinois federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Won't Pick Up Medical Drivers' Class Status Row

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Tuesday to review the D.C. Circuit's determination that a lower court must take another look at its finding that a group of nonemergency medical transportation drivers have enough in common to proceed as a class in their wage and hour action against their employer.

  • February 20, 2024

    9th Circ. Reinstates Air Traffic Controller's Age Bias Suit

    The Ninth Circuit revived a suit Tuesday from an air traffic controller who said the Federal Aviation Administration passed him over for promotions because of his age, ruling the agency can't hide behind a carveout that allows it to restrict the positions to younger applicants.

  • February 20, 2024

    DraftKings Pushes To Keep Strict Limits On Former Exec

    Sports betting company DraftKings Inc. on Tuesday urged a Massachusetts federal court to maintain tight restrictions on a previous executive who is now working for Fanatics, bashing the man's attempts at loosening the court's order as "procedural sophistry" that will threaten its business.

  • February 20, 2024

    Biotech Co. SomaLogic, Former Exec Settle Fight Over Stock

    Colorado-based biotechnology company SomaLogic Inc. and a former co-founder of a company it purchased in 2022 have resolved a lawsuit over the executive's departure and the fate of 400,000 unvested shares, with a California federal judge dismissing the case for good on Friday.

Expert Analysis

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Assessing Merger Guideline Feedback With Machine Learning

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    Large language modeling appears to show that public sentiment matches agency intent around the new merger control guidelines from the Federal Trade Commission and U.S. Justice Department, says Andrew Sfekas at Cornerstone Research.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

  • Grant Compliance Takeaways From Ga. Tech's FCA Settlement

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    Georgia Tech’s recent False Claims Act settlement over its failure to detect compliance shortcomings in a grant program was unique in that it involved a voluntary repayment of funds prior to the resolution, offering a few key lessons for universities receiving research funding from the government, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Deferral Pointers For Employers After $700M Ohtani Deal

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    Darren Goodman and Christine Osvald-Mruz at Lowenstein Sandler examine the legal consequences of Shohei Ohtani's $700 million, 10-year contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers — a high-profile example of nonqualified deferred compensation — and offer lessons for employers of all sizes interested in similar deals.

  • Employer Lessons From Nixed Calif. Arbitration Agreement

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    A California state appeals court’s recent decision to throw out an otherwise valid arbitration agreement, where an employee claimed a confusing electronic signature system led her to agree to unfair terms, should alert employers to scrutinize any waivers or signing procedures that may appear to unconscionably favor the company, say Guillermo Tello and Monique Eginli at Clark Hill.

  • EEO-1 Ruling May Affect Other Gov't Agency Disclosures

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    By tightly construing a rarely litigated but frequently asserted term, a California federal court’s ruling that the Freedom of Information Act does not exempt reports to the U.S. Department of Labor on workplace demographics could expand the range of government contractor information susceptible to public disclosure, says John Zabriskie at Foley & Lardner.

  • Musk Pay Package Ruling Offers Detailed Lesson On Del. Law

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    Anat Alon-Beck and John Livingstone at Case Western Reserve University discuss the specifics that led Delaware's chancellor to rescind Elon Musk's $55.8 billion Tesla pay package on Jan. 30, how the state’s entire fairness doctrine played into the ruling, and its bigger-picture impact on the executive compensation landscape.

  • What's At Stake In High Court NLRB Injunction Case

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    William Baker at Wigdor examines the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to hear Starbucks v. McKinney — where it will consider a long-standing circuit split over the standard for evaluating National Labor Relations Board injunction bids — and explains why the justices’ eventual decision, either way, is unlikely to be a significant blow to labor.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • The State Of Play In NIL, Compensation For Student-Athletes

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    Recent NCAA developments — including name, image, and likeness legislation and a governance and compensation proposal — reflect a shift from the initial hands-off approach to student-athletes' NIL deals and an effort to allow colleges to directly compensate student-athletes without categorizing them as employees, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Employer Lessons From NLRB Judge's Union Bias Ruling

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge’s recent decision that a Virginia drywall contractor unlawfully transferred and fired workers who made union pay complaints illustrates valuable lessons about how employers should respond to protected labor activity and federal labor investigations, says Kenneth Jenero at Holland & Knight.

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