Employment

  • March 27, 2024

    Judge Agrees To Training For 'Overly Harsh' Workplace

    The Judicial Council for the Second Circuit has declined to review the dismissal of a law clerk's complaint against a federal judge, who acknowledged the clerk's claims of their "overly harsh" management style and agreed to participate in workplace conduct counseling and training.

  • March 27, 2024

    Sega Workers Ratify 1st Contract In 'Landmark Moment'

    Unionized Sega of America workers backed the ratification of their first contract with the video game giant, according to an announcement from the union Wednesday, saying the parties agreed to raises, benefits and other protections for workers.

  • March 27, 2024

    DC Circuit Upholds NLRB Firing Decision Despite Legal Shift

    The D.C. Circuit upheld an NLRB ruling that a Cadillac dealer illegally fired a worker even though the board changed the applicable precedent during the appeal, saying Wednesday that the long-running case appears to shake out the same under either version of the shifting standard for worker outbursts.

  • March 27, 2024

    Hospital Co. Can't Quash ERISA Suit Subpoenas, Judge Says

    A Buffalo, New York-area hospital network lost its bid to quash two subpoenas in a proposed Employee Retirement Income Security Act class action Wednesday, with a New York federal judge ruling that the network challenged the subpoenas to two of its advisers in the wrong court.

  • March 27, 2024

    HR Services Co. May Be Liable In Harassment Suit, Court Says

    A Texas appellate court said Wednesday that more fact-finding is needed to determine whether a professional employer organization could be on the hook for a sexual harassment claim brought by a cafeteria worker, but found that the company is, legally, an employer.

  • March 27, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs Allstate In Worker's Religious Bias Appeal

    The Sixth Circuit declined Wednesday to reinstate a former Allstate employee's lawsuit alleging he was fired for expressing faith-based anti-LGBTQ views, saying he failed to rebut the company's argument that he was cut loose for his lackluster performance.

  • March 27, 2024

    Governor Directs Pa. To Use More Project Labor Agreements

    Pennsylvania Gov. Josh Shapiro announced Wednesday that he is directing state agencies to consider including project labor agreements — pre-hiring collective bargaining agreements that can cover multiple contractors and labor unions — in all major capital projects.

  • March 27, 2024

    Bricklayer Seeks OT Pay For Time On 'Shuttle' To Worksites

    A bricklayer alleged that a California-based construction firm should have paid him and his fellow workers to ride a shuttle up to an hour each way to job sites, according to a proposed class action made public in Pennsylvania state court Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    Yellow Corp. Pension Fund Liability To Be Decided In Ch. 11

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge on Wednesday denied the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp.'s bid to take a dispute with Yellow Corp. over $7.8 billion in retirement fund withdrawal liability claims to arbitration, finding the dispute would be best resolved through the trucking firm's Chapter 11 claims allowance process.

  • March 27, 2024

    T-Mobile Gets COVID Vax Bias Suit Narrowed

    A Michigan federal judge cut down but ultimately kept alive a former T-Mobile worker's suit Wednesday alleging the company illegally denied his request for a religious exemption to its COVID-19 vaccine requirement, ruling that a jury needs to review the claim.

  • March 27, 2024

    Foreign Workers Sue Over Alleged Illegal Recruiting Scheme

    An Atlanta-based building materials wholesaler and two recruitment and staffing agencies were hit with a proposed class action alleging they lured skilled Mexican engineers and technicians to the U.S. to fill manual labor positions under a temporary visa program for high-skilled workers.

  • March 27, 2024

    COVID Prompted Equity Plan Edit, Raytheon Tells Chancery

    Raytheon Technologies Corp. amended employee compensation plans in early 2020 to mitigate "head-spinning unprecedented volatility" from the COVID-19 pandemic, and a shareholder's allegations that directors acted in bad faith by failing to seek stockholder approval should be dismissed, the aerospace company told Delaware's Court of Chancery on Wednesday.

  • March 27, 2024

    Calif. Rail Biz Attys Face DQ Bid Over Bad Faith, Info Breach

    A Black engineer accusing Pacific Harbor Line of workplace racial bias has urged a California federal judge to bar Buchannan Ingersoll & Rooney LLP from representing the railroad company, citing a sanctions bid against his counsel that had "no evidentiary basis" and "improper" communication with a paralegal for the engineer's legal team.

  • March 27, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Ex-NY Law Clerk's Harassment Suit

    The Second Circuit Wednesday agreed with a New York federal district court's dismissal of a suit brought by a former New York law clerk accusing the state's judicial system of covering for a judge she says sexually harassed her, holding that it lacked jurisdiction to hear the appeal.

  • March 27, 2024

    Construction Orgs Call Prevailing Wage Rule Unconstitutional

    Several construction groups said the U.S. Department of Labor is illegally trying to expand the reach of the Davis-Bacon Act with its final rule regulating prevailing wages, urging a Texas federal court to bring the rule to a screeching halt.

  • March 27, 2024

    Calif. High Court Gives Guideposts For What Counts As Work

    The California Supreme Court's decision that a construction contractor must pay workers for the time they spent waiting in their cars to go through a security check before leaving the job site provides guideposts for determining when wages are owed in other scenarios, attorneys told Law360.

  • March 27, 2024

    Atlanta Firm Wins Fees In Bias Case Over 'Torrent' Of Abuse

    A Georgia federal judge awarded more than $165,000 in attorney fees and more than $33,000 in lost pay to a Black woman who was awarded nearly $3.5 million at trial in November after suffering on-the-job racial and sexual discrimination, harassment and retaliation.

  • March 27, 2024

    Eli Lilly Age Bias Suit Over Promotions Nabs Collective Status

    An age discrimination suit accusing Eli Lilly of passing over older workers for promotions in favor of millennials can move forward as a collective action, an Indiana federal judge ruled, finding thousands of workers may have been affected by the same policy.

  • March 27, 2024

    House Subpoenas PBGC Over $127M Teamsters Overpayment

    A House committee subpoenaed the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. as part of its probe into a $127 million overpayment to Teamsters pensioners who had already died, distributed as part of a multibillion-dollar bailout of multiemployer funds Congress approved during the pandemic.

  • March 27, 2024

    NJ AG Says Teachers On Maternity Leave Faced Possible Bias

    The New Jersey attorney general's office said Wednesday that its Division on Civil Rights preliminarily concluded that a public school district may have violated discrimination laws by preventing women on parental leave from coaching extracurricular activities.

  • March 27, 2024

    Atlanta Immigration Firm Accused Of Not Paying Paralegal OT

    An Atlanta immigration law firm is facing a lawsuit in Georgia federal court from a paralegal who says he was misclassified as an independent contractor and denied overtime pay, despite routinely working upward of 40 hours per week.

  • March 27, 2024

    Meta Settles Fired Worker's COVID Vax Religious Bias Suit

    Facebook parent company Meta has agreed to settle a Washington federal suit brought by a former project manager who claimed he was illegally fired after refusing to be vaccinated against COVID-19 because of his religious beliefs.

  • March 27, 2024

    Cannabis Retailer Sues To Revive Union Decertification Bid

    A western Massachusetts cannabis retailer has asked a state court to reinstate an employee's petition to decertify a budding local of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, which was dismissed by a state labor board following a settlement of separate prohibited practices complaints.

  • March 26, 2024

    Jackson Paints Abortion Clash As Microcosm Of Bigger Brawl

    A war of words Tuesday at the U.S. Supreme Court over access to abortion medication marked a climactic moment after a lengthy legal slugfest. But probing questions from Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson illustrated that the main event for reproductive rights was also simply a single round in a much larger fight over the government's regulatory powers.

  • March 26, 2024

    11th Circ. Considers Reviving Urologist's Sex Bias Suit

    A urologist who alleged gender discrimination led to her removal from the University of Florida's urology department urged the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday to overturn a district court decision freeing the university and two clinic doctors from claims levied against them in her sex bias suit.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • Why CFTC Whistleblowers Are Crucial To Crypto Regulation

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    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission's whistleblower program has proven to be a key tool in the U.S.' efforts to police cryptocurrency, but a funding issue shows that it has become a victim of its own success, says Stephen Kohn at Kohn Kohn.

  • PAGA Turns 20: An Employer Road Map For Managing Claims

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    As California’s Private Attorneys General Act turns 20, the arbitrability of individual and representative claims remains relatively unsettled — but employers can potentially avoid litigation involving both types of claims by following guidance from the California Supreme Court’s Adolph v. Uber ruling, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Securities Class Actions Show No Signs of Slowing In 2024

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    Plaintiffs asserted securities class actions at elevated levels in 2023 — a sign that filings will remain high in the year ahead — as they switched gears to target companies that allegedly have failed to anticipate supply chain disruptions, persistent inflation, rising interest rates and other macroeconomic headwinds, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Workplace Challenges Amid Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

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    Recent tension over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has caused challenges in the employment sphere, sparking the question of whether employees can be legally disciplined for speaking out on issues related to the conflict, which depends on various circumstances, says Alok Nadig at Sanford Heisler.

  • Tips For Contractors Preparing For Potential Gov't Shutdown

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    With elements of the Congress’ latest continuing resolution expiring on Jan. 19, companies that may be fatigued by preparing for potential shutdown after potential shutdown should consider the current political climate and take specific steps now, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • 5 NLRA Changes To Make Nonunion Employers Wary In 2024

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    As the National Labor Relations Board continues pushing an aggressive pro-union agenda and a slate of strict workplace rules, nonunion employers should study significant labor law changes from 2023 to understand why National Labor Relations Act compliance will be so crucial to protecting themselves in the new year, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Expect National Security Scrutiny Of Higher Ed To Continue

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    In 2023, the federal government significantly elevated the national security responsibilities of academic communities, so universities and research laboratories should take a more rigorous approach to research partnerships, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • High Court's Job Bias Questions May Predict Title VII Ruling

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    Employers may be able to predict — and prepare for — important changes to workplace discrimination laws by examining the questions the U.S. Supreme Court asked during oral arguments for Muldrow v. St. Louis, where several justices seemed to favor a low threshold for Title VII suits, says Wendy LaManque at Pryor Cashman.

  • What To Know About FCA Cybersecurity Enforcement

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    Now is a good time for practitioners, government contractors and potential relators to review recent developments in cybersecurity-related False Claims Act enforcement, and consider best practices for navigating this space in the new year, say Ellen London at London & Stout, and Li Yu and Molly Knobler at DiCello Levitt.

  • NLRA Expansion May Come With Risks For Workers

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    The last few years have seen a rapid expansion of the National Labor Relations Act to increase labor law coverage in as many ways and to as many areas as possible, but this could potentially weaken rather than strengthen support for unions and worker rights in the U.S., says Daniel Johns at Cozen O’Connor.

  • What One Litigator Learned Serving On A Jury

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    Kilpatrick attorney April Isaacson shares insights for trial lawyers from her recent experience serving on a jury for the first time, including lessons about the impact of frequent sidebars, considerations for using demonstratives, the importance of clear jury instructions, and the unconscious habits that can drive jurors mad.

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