Employment

  • April 01, 2024

    Feds Back Guilty Verdict After Software Execs' Tax Fraud Trial

    Federal prosecutors on Monday defended a jury verdict finding two former software executives in North Carolina guilty of failing to pay employment taxes, saying sufficient evidence supported their convictions.

  • April 01, 2024

    Mich. Can't Get Immunity In Courthouse ADA Class Action

    Attorneys with disabilities and a disability rights advocate can proceed with a proposed class action aimed at forcing accessibility improvements at several Michigan courthouses and government buildings, a Michigan federal judge ruled Saturday, rejecting the state's argument that it was immune from the suit.  

  • April 01, 2024

    Mass. Top Court At A Loss Over 7-Eleven Wage Case

    The top court in Massachusetts on Monday appeared stumped by whether owners of 7-Eleven franchisees should be classified as employees under state law, with one justice calling the issue "almost incomprehensible."

  • April 01, 2024

    Right-Wing Personality Hit With Severance Charge At NLRB

    Conservative media personality Steven Crowder was hit with a National Labor Relations Board charge alleging he's leaning on an illegal separation agreement in a suit to stop an ex-producer from speaking out about him.

  • April 01, 2024

    SmartRent Workers Get Class Cert. In Unpaid OT Row

    A Georgia federal judge has granted conditional class certification to a group of former and current employees of a smart home technology firm, who allege the company failed to compensate them correctly for overtime hours they worked.

  • April 01, 2024

    Union Backs USPS In Bias Suit That Went To High Court

    A Christian postal worker who claimed he was unlawfully punished for seeking Sundays off should lose his religious bias case under the standard the U.S. Supreme Court set when it revived his case in 2023, a letter carriers union told a Pennsylvania federal judge.

  • April 01, 2024

    Judge Won't Make EEOC Pay Atty Fees For Unsuccessful Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission doesn't have to pay a Georgia hospital's attorney fees after jurors found in favor of the medical center on disability bias claims, a federal judge ruled, saying the jury's siding with the hospital didn't make the agency's suit frivolous.

  • April 01, 2024

    NJ Courts Get Out Of Suit Alleging Ex-Judge Harassed Official

    The New Jersey Administrative Office of the Courts has gotten out of a lawsuit from a municipal court administrator alleging she was sexually harassed by a former municipal court judge, arguing that the woman was never an employee of the office.

  • April 01, 2024

    Staten Island Firm Must Face Hostile Work Environment Claim

    A New York federal judge has partially dismissed an employment discrimination suit against a State Island law firm, nixing discrimination and retaliation claims brought by a Black former office manager while allowing claims over the firm's allegedly hostile work environment to proceed to trial.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Exec Sues Canadian Hockey League Team Over Firing

    The former vice president of finance for the Canadian Hockey League's Portland Winterhawks has sued the team and its general manager, claiming that the general manager intended to get the former executive fired from his new job due to the unfounded belief that he embezzled money from the franchise.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fla. Atty Can't Escape $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction

    A Florida attorney fell short in trying to nix her conviction for conspiracy to commit wire fraud when a Georgia federal court found the jury heard and saw a "plethora" of evidence to show she submitted fraudulent loan applications in an effort to obtain money meant to help small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Teacher, District Seek Wins In Pronoun Policy Bias Suit

    A former teacher and the Ohio school district she accused of forcing her to resign after she refused to use the preferred names and pronouns of her transgender students each filed briefs urging a Buckeye State federal judge to grant them early wins.

  • April 01, 2024

    Amazon's Disability Inclusion Efforts A Sham, Suit Says

    Amazon's stated commitments to disability inclusion are a sham, a California worker with cerebral palsy claimed in a proposed class action, saying the company gave him a warehouse gig despite his many warnings that he couldn't meet the job's physical demands.

  • April 01, 2024

    With Suit, NJ City Looks To Clear The Air About Cops' Pot Use

    A New Jersey city's lawsuit demanding clarity over whether state or federal law governs off-duty pot use for cops could help cannabis and employment lawyers navigate a growing battle between workers' rights and workplace safety.

  • March 29, 2024

    Petition Watch: Off-Label Ads, Retiree Discrimination & PPE

    A Utah attorney has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to determine whether allegedly retaliatory IRS summonses can be quashed, and two former pharmaceutical executives are challenging the constitutionality of their convictions for marketing the off-label use of a drug. Here, Law360 looks at recently filed petitions that you might've missed.

  • March 29, 2024

    Employment Authority: Abortion Pill Case On Attys' Radar

    Law360's Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with how employment attorneys are keeping on their radar the abortion pill case in the U.S. Supreme Court, how the indictment of a well-known New York pizzeria shows how criminal prosecution is used in wage theft cases, and how the NLRB's push to expand remedies for employees who face discipline concerns employers.

  • March 29, 2024

    Drivers Slam Eve-Of-Trial Arbitration Bid In OT Class Action

    A group of chauffeurs slammed its employer's bid to compel arbitration of unpaid wage claims less than three weeks before the claims are scheduled to go to trial, calling the motion a frivolous, eleventh-hour effort to disrupt trial preparation.

  • March 29, 2024

    OSHA Finalizes Rule Letting Unions Join Job Site Inspections

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued a final rule Friday broadening workers' right to choose who represents them during safety inspections, overwriting an old standard that required the representative to be a fellow employee and opening the door for outside representatives such as those from unions.

  • March 29, 2024

    Ala. Steel Mill Asks 11th Circ. To Undo $13M Default Judgment

    An Alabama steel mill urged the Eleventh Circuit on Friday to reverse a misconduct-triggered default judgment that led to workers being awarded $13.1 million in a wage and hour suit they filed alleging the mill shorted hundreds of workers on hourly wages, overtime pay and bonuses.

  • March 29, 2024

    Ohio School Beats Race Bias Suit Over Pandemic Layoffs

    The University of Akron defeated a lawsuit alleging it targeted two finance professors for layoffs during the pandemic because one is Black and one is Asian, with an Ohio federal judge ruling Friday that the academics relied on faulty statistical analysis to back up their claims.

  • March 29, 2024

    AT&T Call Center Workers Lose Cert. Bid in OT Suit, For Now

    Call center workers looking to hold AT&T liable for failing to pay them overtime wages were denied collective certification, with an Illinois federal judge ruling they needed to propose a narrower group definition because there was not enough evidence to support a nationwide collective.

  • March 29, 2024

    Fiat Chrysler Can't Get Out Of Workers' Overtime Suit

    Fiat Chrysler must face a proposed collective action by workers accusing the automaker of failing to fully pay overtime wages, with a Michigan federal judge saying Friday that the company's argument improperly attacked the claims' merits rather than whether there was enough proof to keep them in court.

  • March 29, 2024

    SEIU Unit Defends Dartmouth Men's Basketball Union Ruling

    The Service Employees International Union local that recently won a landmark election to represent the Dartmouth College men's basketball team defended a National Labor Relations Board official's decision to greenlight the election, saying the case fell within her jurisdiction under federal labor law's "strikingly" broad definition of employee.

  • March 29, 2024

    Exec Says Pharma Co. Yanked Job Offer Over ADHD Medication

    A Pennsylvania man with more than two decades of experience in the pharmaceutical industry claims he was denied a job after testing positive for amphetamines, even though he notified the Garden State company that he was on medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, in violation of New Jersey's Law Against Discrimination.

  • March 29, 2024

    DraftKings Rips Former Exec's 'Lies' In Ongoing Fanatics Spat

    Former DraftKings executive Michael Hermalyn lied in his opposition last week to its preliminary injunction request, just as he had during his departure to rival Fanatics and throughout a trade secrets and breach of contract suit against him, the company has told a Massachusetts federal court in defending its injunction request.

Expert Analysis

  • The State Of Play In NIL, Compensation For Student-Athletes

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    Recent NCAA developments — including name, image, and likeness legislation and a governance and compensation proposal — reflect a shift from the initial hands-off approach to student-athletes' NIL deals and an effort to allow colleges to directly compensate student-athletes without categorizing them as employees, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Employer Lessons From NLRB Judge's Union Bias Ruling

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge’s recent decision that a Virginia drywall contractor unlawfully transferred and fired workers who made union pay complaints illustrates valuable lessons about how employers should respond to protected labor activity and federal labor investigations, says Kenneth Jenero at Holland & Knight.

  • New SDNY Whistleblower Program May Be A Game-Changer

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    A new pilot program in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York promises to immunize from prosecution certain individuals who blow the whistle on financial crimes and corruption, and if similar self-disclosure programs are any indication, this significant new policy may measurably increase white collar investigations, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • Directors And Officers Face Unique AI-Related Risks

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    As privacy, intellectual property and discrimination lawsuits focusing on artificial intelligence increase, corporate directors and officers must stay aware of associated risks, including those related to compliance, litigation and cybersecurity, says Jonathan Meer at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Best Employer Practices Under Whistleblower Protection Act

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    The Whistleblower Protection Act provides important protections for employees who report wrongdoing in the federal government, and employers should take steps to ensure compliance with the WPA, as these protections are essential to promoting a workplace culture of ethics and accountability, says Emory Moore at Honigman.

  • NY, Del. May Be Trending Against Noncompete Enforceability

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    While neither New York nor Delaware has statutory restrictions on noncompete provisions, recent legislative actions and judicial decisions indicate a trend against enforcement of restrictive covenants in both equity award and employment agreements, says Irene Bassock at Cohen Buckmann.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Considerations For Lawyer Witnesses After FTX Trial

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    Sam Bankman-Fried's recent trial testimony about his lawyers' involvement in FTX's business highlights the need for attorney-witnesses to understand privilege issues in order to avoid costly discovery disputes and, potentially, uncover critical evidence an adversary might seek to conceal, says Lawrence Bluestone at Genova Burns.

  • Changes To Note In New AAA Mass Arbitration Rules

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    The American Arbitration Association updated its mass arbitration rules earlier this month — clarifying issues that were previously being litigated in front of the AAA, and significantly streamlining the process of getting to a merits arbitration for claimants who have suffered similar wrongs and are bound by mandatory arbitration clauses, say attorneys at Labaton Keller.

  • 9 Tools To Manage PAGA Claims After Calif. High Court Ruling

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    In Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills, the California Supreme Court recently dealt a blow to employers by ruling that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, but defendants and courts can still use arbitration agreements, due process challenges and other methods when dealing with unmanageable claims, says Ryan Krueger at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Workplace Speech Policies Limit Legal And PR Risks

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    As workers increasingly speak out on controversies like the 2024 elections and the Israel-Hamas war, companies should implement practical workplace expression policies and plans to protect their brands and mitigate the risk of violating federal and state anti-discrimination and free speech laws, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Staying Ahead Of The AI Policymaking Curve

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    With artificial intelligence poised to be the hottest legislative and regulatory topic in 2024, expect the AI policymaking toolbox to continue to expand and evolve as stakeholders in the U.S. and abroad develop, deploy, use and learn more about these technologies, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • The 7th Circ.'s Top 10 Civil Opinions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Jenner & Block examine the most significant decisions issued by the Seventh Circuit in 2023, and explain how they may affect issues related to antitrust, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction and more.

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