Employment

  • April 10, 2024

    Starbucks Fired Barista For Having Panic Attack, Court Told

    A Starbucks manager berated a barista who suffered from anxiety and depression until he had a panic attack, then fired him, according to a suit filed in Florida federal court.

  • April 10, 2024

    Electrical Workers Union Sues LIRR Over Cannabis Firing

    The union that represents Long Island Rail Road workers is suing the commuter railroad for firing an employee who had been with it for 25 years after he allegedly tested positive for marijuana when returning to work after being treated for cancer.

  • April 09, 2024

    Walmart Hit With $101M Verdict In Trial Over PPE Contracts

    An Arkansas jury hit Walmart with a $101 million verdict Tuesday for breaching an agreement to purchase more than $500 million in personal protective equipment amid the coronavirus pandemic, while also finding in favor of the retail giant's tort counterclaims.

  • April 09, 2024

    'No Merit' To Talent Co.'s Bid To DQ Execs' Attys, Judge Says

    A California state judge on Tuesday told attorneys for A3 Artists Agency and its chair, Adam Bold, that their allegation of a conflict of interest "has no merit" and that she tentatively would deny their motion to disqualify opposing counsel representing executives suing Bold and the agency for breach of contract.

  • April 09, 2024

    Starbucks' Calif. Stores Lack Lactation Spaces, Suit Says

    A Starbucks employee brought a proposed class action in California state court on behalf of similarly situated workers in the Golden State over the coffeehouse chain's "systemic failure" to provide adequate lactation spaces and sufficient pumping time for nursing employees.

  • April 09, 2024

    Excuses 'Twisted' To Transgender Prof, Solid To Kent State

    Kent State University "twisted itself into knots" to justify its alleged discrimination, a transgender professor has told an Ohio federal court, as the school in turn claimed the scholar was denied a promotion for bad-mouthing colleagues online. 

  • April 09, 2024

    Texas Court Unsure It Has Jurisdiction Over Auto Co.'s Rival

    A three-judge panel for a Texas appellate court prodded the argument of an automotive repair services company, asking how it could establish that it has jurisdiction over the company's business rival given the rival's loose ties to Texas during oral arguments Tuesday.

  • April 09, 2024

    Colo. Justices Doubt Workers' Comp Stops Insurance Suits

    A Colorado Supreme Court justice expressed doubt Tuesday that lawmakers, in crafting Colorado's workers' compensation law, intended to make employees choose between getting workers' comp and suing their employer's auto insurer when injured on the job by an underinsured driver — tackling a question that has stymied the state's federal judiciary.

  • April 09, 2024

    Carpenters Urge 9th Circ. To Restart Union Retirement Fight

    A group of carpenters urged the Ninth Circuit to revive allegations that their union's retirement plan trustees played fast and loose with their savings, saying Tuesday that the trustees should face claims that their risky investment choices caused two retirement plans to plummet in value when the pandemic hit.

  • April 09, 2024

    Healthcare Co. Can't Sue Ex-Exec For Causing Canada Tax Hit

    A Colorado federal judge shot down a pharmacy automation company's suit alleging its former chief commercial officer cost it nearly CA$1.2 million ($907,000) in Canadian taxes by not telling his employer he had moved out of the country, saying the company hasn't shown it suffered any damage as a result.

  • April 09, 2024

    Hotel Owed Union Bargaining Over Renovation, DC Circ. Says

    A Hilton hotel in Alaska is on the hook for federal labor law violations after renovating rooms in a way that changed housekeepers' work conditions without sufficiently looping in the employees' union, the D.C. Circuit held Tuesday, enforcing a National Labor Relations Board decision.

  • April 09, 2024

    Challengers To H-2A Wage Rule Denied Extra Discovery

    A federal judge has refused to let agricultural businesses gather more information on the decision-making behind new H-2A agricultural worker minimum wages, rejecting claims that more discovery was warranted in light of a September order allowing the wages to take hold.

  • April 09, 2024

    EPA Reaches $1.4M Deal With Chemical Co. Over Plant Fire

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday said that it had recently reached a settlement with Houston-based Sasol Chemicals LLC over a 2022 chemical plant explosion in Westlake, Louisiana, over which the company agreed to pay more than $1.4 million in civil penalties and fix violations.

  • April 09, 2024

    Ex-Fox News Anchor Continues Fighting Forced Arbitration

    Gretchen Carlson, a former Fox News anchor and a leading advocate for ending forced arbitration after suing Fox News' former chair and CEO over sexual harassment allegations, told senators on Tuesday that more is needed to protect workers, particularly older ones, despite important legislation enacted two years ago.

  • April 09, 2024

    Medieval Times Drops Appeal In TM Battle With Union

    Medieval Times has dropped its bid to revive trademark infringement claims against the labor union representing its entertainers, according to a filing in the Third Circuit.

  • April 09, 2024

    Hogan Lovells Adds Baker Botts Enviro Litigators In DC, SF

    Hogan Lovells announced Tuesday it has hired three environmental crisis and white collar attorneys from Baker Botts LLP to bolster efforts to steer clients through criminal environmental and workplace safety investigations and other matters.

  • April 09, 2024

    Ex-DraftKings Exec Loses Bid For $310K In Atty Fees

    A California federal judge will not award the $310,000 in attorney fees a former DraftKings executive claims it cost to handle the ping-ponging of his lawsuit between federal and state court, ruling the removal at the behest of his ex-employer was "suspect" but not unreasonable.

  • April 09, 2024

    ArentFox Schiff Bets On Auto Sector With 4 Boston Partners

    ArentFox Schiff LLP has brought on four partners from midsize Boston firm Burns & Levinson LLP who specialize in representing the automotive industry, according to a Tuesday announcement by the firm.

  • April 09, 2024

    Former Blockchain Stock Exchange CEO Sues For $1.4M Pay

    The former CEO of a defunct blockchain securities exchange claims she was denied her final year's salary, bonus and other compensation valued at nearly $1.4 million, according to a complaint filed in Massachusetts state court.

  • April 09, 2024

    Ex-Legal Tech Exec Says Co. Sued Just To Preempt Her Suit

    A former business executive at a Texas law firm and legal technology company called on a Texas federal court Monday to toss her former employer's lawsuit against her, claiming the company and its founders attempted to preempt her New York lawsuit alleging sexual harassment and unlawful termination.

  • April 08, 2024

    Sex Life Had No Place In Sex Harassment Trial, 9th Circ. Told

    An ex-Behemoth worker asked the Ninth Circuit on Monday to order a new trial after a jury rejected his sexual harassment and hostile work environment suit against the video game company, arguing the district court erroneously allowed jurors to hear about his sex life and vulgar speech.

  • April 08, 2024

    Allstate Sues Ex-Agent For Post-Litigation 'Smear Campaign'

    Allstate Insurance Co. has alleged in Colorado federal court that a former independent contractor it previously sued for allegedly stealing trade secrets has since launched an online "smear campaign" to spread false claims that the company is selling its customers' sensitive personal data to criminals and that it flouted a court order in the earlier suit by posting confidential deposition excerpts.

  • April 08, 2024

    Red Robin Reaches $600K Deal To End EEOC Claims In Wash.

    Red Robin has agreed to pay $600,000 and bolster its anti-sexual harassment policies to end a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission lawsuit alleging a line cook in Washington state retaliated against female co-workers for objecting to his offensive comments, according to a proposed consent decree filed in federal court in Seattle.

  • April 08, 2024

    H-2A Workers Want OK On $900K OT Deal With Va. Farms

    Two Mexican farmworkers are asking a Virginia federal court to greenlight their $900,000 settlement with an agricultural association and two farms that they say cheated temporary workers out of $2.5 million in overtime pay.

  • April 08, 2024

    Ford Motor Co. OT Claims Transferred To Michigan

    An Ohio federal judge sent a proposed collective action by a former Ford Motor Co. plant worker to the Eastern District of Michigan on Monday after the worker and the auto manufacturer said the case is better dealt with near Ford's headquarters in Detroit.

Expert Analysis

  • Future Not Looking Bright For Calif. Employee Nonsolicits

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    California's new legislation imposing potentially harsh consequences on employers for attempting to enforce noncompetes raises questions about the fate of employee nonsolicitation agreements — and both federal and state court decisions suggest the days of the latter may be numbered, say Anthony Oncidi and Philippe Lebel at Proskauer.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Del. Ruling Stands Out In Thorny Noncompete Landscape

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    In Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the Delaware Supreme Court last month upheld the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, providing a noteworthy opinion amid a time of increasing disfavor toward noncompetes and following a string of Chancery Court rulings deeming them unreasonable, say Margaret Butler and Steven Goldberg at BakerHostetler.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

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    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Best Practices In Light Of NY Anti-Trans Bias Report

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    A recent report from the New York State Department of Labor indicates that bias against transgender and nonbinary people endures in the workplace, highlighting why employers must create supportive policies and gender transition plans, not only to mitigate the risk of discrimination claims, but also to foster an inclusive work culture, says Michelle Phillips at Jackson Lewis.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • HR Antitrust Compliance Crucial Amid DOJ Scrutiny

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    The Justice Department's Antitrust Division recently announced a required human resources component for antitrust compliance programs, which means companies should evaluate their policies to prevent, detect and remediate potential violations as they add training for HR professionals, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

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    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.

  • Mass Arb. Rule Changes May Be A Hindrance For Consumers

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    The American Arbitration Association's recent changes to its mass arbitration supplementary rules and fee schedule, including a shift from filing fees to initiation and per-case fees, may reduce consumers' ability to counteract businesses' mandatory arbitration agreements, say Eduard Korsinsky and Alexander Krot at Levi & Korsinsky.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

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